Agathocles


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Agathocles

 

Born 361 or 360 B.C.; died 289 B.C. Tyrant of Syracuse from 317 (or 316). A potter as a youth, he subsequently advanced as a talented military leader. With the support of mercenaries and impoverished citizens, he overthrew the oligarchy and came to power. By 313 B.C. he had conquered almost all the Greek cities in Sicily. From 312 to 306, he waged war with varying success against Carthage for control of Sicily and concluded by maintaining the status quo. In approximately 300–289, he fought with the Bruttii in southern Italy. In 299 he conquered the island of Corfu. The reign of Agathocles was the time of greatest military power and cultural development for the Syracuse state, which began to decline after his death.

REFERENCES

Zhebelev, S. A. “Agafokl, polnomochnyi stratig.” Zhurnal Ministerstva narodnogo prosveshcheniia. Feb. 1898.
Tillyard, H. J. W. Agathocles. [Cambridge,] 1908.

Agathocles

(361–289 B. C.) Syracusan king; “burned his ships behind him” in attacking Carthage. [Gk. Hist.: Walsh Classical, 9]
References in classic literature ?
The Carthaginians, reduced to extreme necessity, were compelled to come to terms with Agathocles, and, leaving Sicily to him, had to be content with the possession of Africa.
Still, if the courage of Agathocles in entering into and extricating himself from dangers be considered, together with his greatness of mind in enduring and overcoming hardships, it cannot be seen why he should be esteemed less than the most notable captain.
And his destruction would have been as difficult as that of Agathocles if he had not allowed himself to be overreached by Cesare Borgia, who took him with the Orsini and Vitelli at Sinigalia, as was stated above.
Those who practise the first system are able, by aid of God or man, to mitigate in some degree their rule, as Agathocles did.
I have translated Diodorus' Books 16, 19 and 20 into Polish and I am strongly convinced that I was actually reading extensive parts of Hieronymus of Cardia's history; of an anonymous historian of Agathocles (Duris?
He takes it in stages, from the death of Agathocles to the arrival of Pyrrhus in 278; military events, political meanings, and ideological implications during the rule of Pyrrhus; and Greeks and natives of Sicily among Hellenistic kingship during the first Punic war.
NECTARIA XITA, [1] [dagger] IOANNIS GEORGIOU [2] [dagger] ANTHOULA CHATZIKYRIAKIDOU, [2] MARIA VOUNATSOU, [3,4] GERASIMOS-PETER PAPASSOTIRIOU, [4] 1OANNIS PAPASSOTIRIOU, [4] * and AGATHOCLES TSATSOULIS [1]
Written from prison in Massachusetts, this P&F has the obligatory word search, write-ups of the bands Solitary Neglect and Agathocles, a great comic, some random stuff, and an interview with Rob of Lowcard 'fine.
Literary allusions include the "retreating sound of the tide across the shingle" (186), which refers to the loss of faith in Dover Beach; a quote from Piers Plowman, Life of Do-well (15) (Dowell's "signature"); and a mention of "seventy fountains" (183) taken from Agathocles.
Virtu and the Example of Agathocles in Machiavelli's Prince.
Martinez, "Benefit of Absence"; Ezio Raimondi, "The Politician and the Centaur"; John Freccero, "Medusa and the Madonna of Forli: Political Sexuality in Machiavelli"; Barbara Spackman, "Politics on the Warpath: Machiavelli's Art of War"; Victoria Kahn, "VirtU and the Example of Agathocles in Machiavelli's Prince"; Albert Ascoli, "Machiavelli's Gift of Counsel"; Giuseppe Mazzotta, "Machiavelli and Vico"; Nancy S.
Agathocles cannot be praised for his virtue due to the fact that he was very wicked; this does not mean that Machiavelli cannot recognize that virtue, nor does it prevent him from recommending Agathocles as an example of "cruelty well used"; The Prince, 8.