Agglomeration

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agglomeration

[ə‚gläm·ə′rā·shən]
(food engineering)
A technique that combines powdered material to form larger, more soluble particles by intermingling in a humid atmosphere.
(metallurgy)
Conversion of small pieces of low-grade iron ore into larger lumps by application of heat.
(meteorology)
The process in which particles grow by collision with and assimilation of cloud particles or other precipitation particles. Also known as coagulation.
(science and technology)
An indiscriminately formed cluster of particles.

Agglomeration

 

in microbiology the formation of clusters (heaps) of microorganisms in liquids or in tissue as a result of a change in the physical or chemical properties of microbial cells under the influence of immune bodies and the like.

agglomeration

The collecting together of tiny suspended particles into a mass of larger size, one which will settle more rapidly.
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, one economy, namely Australia, exhibits both relatively larger agglomeration economies and also a larger home-market effect than the relatively smaller economy, New Zealand.
Much evidence confirms the crucial importance of agglomeration economies for innovative business start-ups.
As discussed, agglomeration economies benefit firms in several important ways (see Feldman (2000) for a summary of the literature).
Knowledge transfers and spillovers that can occur from firm-university or firm-college relationships (or, collectively, HEI linkages) are often assumed to be commonplace in areas of high-technology firm concentration, and it is presumed that these relationships promote the cluster's agglomeration economies and attractiveness to other firms.
Based on studies of FDI location choice and firm performance in China's economic transition, we may decompose the location effect on FDI performance into the following factors: location advantages, agglomeration economies, and privatization.
Agglomeration Economies (AGGLOM): Manufacturing production generally could become more efficient due to agglomeration economies that result from existing manufacturing activities locating in close proximity.
The estimates of the three sub-periods show similar results for the coefficients of agglomeration economies with significantly expected signs and R&D with insignificance.
Although the Denver/Boulder case is not necessarily characteristic of traditional agglomeration economies based around core technologies or fabrication clusters, Lyons (1995) has illustrated that the benefits attached to 'text book' agglomeration do exist in a once peripheral space.
Further, he acknowledges that a premium results from agglomeration economies after construction of a mall is completed, but that "this increment represents exactly the market value of the factors of its production (i.
Agglomeration economies are derived from economies of scale, which exist in large cities that offer locational advantages for the performance of certain types of economic activity.
The concept of an industry cluster involves the establishments' proximity to one another, while the concept of agglomeration economies involves both proximity and the extent to which establishments are affected by nearby establishments.
If the resulting adjustment involves relocation, and new investments incur sunk costs and benefit from agglomeration economies, then the new location can become the long-term home of the industry, permanently changing the industrial structure of the home and host economies.