Agglutination in Linguistics

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Agglutination in Linguistics

 

the formation of grammatical structures and derived words by the addition of affixes to a root or stem. Each affix has a unique grammatical meaning and function. Affixes are discrete; they do not blend with the root or other affixes in a word. But depending on the phonological properties of the root word, vowels of affixes can undergo phonetic changes; consonants can change at morpheme boundaries, but only in accordance with the phonetic peculiarities of the given language. This is observed, for instance, in most Altaic and Finno-Ugric languages.

Agglutinative languages can be recognized by their morphological characteristic—agglutination. The Turkmen word ishchilerimizden (“from our workers”) consists of the root ish (work); the word-building affix chi, which creates ishchi (worker); and the three inflectional affixes which add plural number (-ler), first-person plural possession (-imiz), and the ablative case (-den).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.