Agglutinative Languages

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Agglutinative Languages

 

languages whose characteristic morphological feature is word formation and word change through agglutination.

Among the agglutinative languages are the Turkic languages; the Finno-Ugric languages; the Tungus-Manchurian, Korean, and Japanese languages; some of the American Indian languages; and a number of African languages. Agglutinative languages are contrasted to flective or flectional languages, although agglutinative languages also exhibit traits of flection (for example, Finnish and Udmurt), while flective languages make some use of agglutination.

References in periodicals archive ?
Since Turkish is an agglutinative language in which prefixation as a derivation process is extremely rare, adjectives referring to taste are formed exclusively by the process of suffixation.
Korean is an agglutinative language where a (dative) case is assigned by adding the postpositional -cwe morpheme.
First, it is an agglutinative language (such as Finnish or Turkish) so that all inflectional morphemes are morphologically complex, corresponding to phrases or inflected verbs, comprising several morphological constituents (De Rijk, 2007; Hualde & Ortiz de Urbina, 2003; Laka, 1996).
Finnish is an agglutinative language. Agglutination is a process in linguistic morphology derivation in which complex words are formed by stringing together morphemes, each of which has a single grammatic or semantic meaning.
IsiXhosa is an agglutinative language which means that a variety of prefixes and suffixes are used to alter the basic meaning of a root word.
It's also an agglutinative language. I like to use Anatolian cultural experiences right next to universal experiences.
Like German, Finnish is an agglutinative language, with long words consisting of many components.
Zulu is an agglutinative language and uses affixes to express a variety of grammatical relations and meanings.
An agglutinative language, Turkish linked root nouns to long strings of suffixes, thus dispensing with definite and indefinite articles and freestanding prepositions.
Quechua--or, more properly, Runasimi, meaning literally "People Mouth"--is an agglutinative language, adding syllables onto a root to form long, meaningful words.
Yup'ik is an agglutinative language, in which base words change and become more subtle through the addition of postbases (or modifying suffixes), generally one or two, though half a dozen is not unusual.
Consider their language: Kurlansky mentions the fact that it is an agglutinative language, similar to Finnish and Hungarian, but he doesn't seem to be aware of the most recent determinations, namely, that Basque is a vestige of the language of the Aquitanian people, the last pre-Indo European language group to survive in the area extending from the Pyrcnecs to the Garonne and on down to present-day Navarre.