Aghlabids

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Aghlabids

 

a dynasty of Arabian emirs (800–909) in Ifriqiya, vassals of the caliphate. Its founder was a vice regent appointed by Harun al-Rashid, Ibrahim ibn al-Aghlab (800–812). The Aghlabids fought against the tribes that came forward under the banner of Kharijitism and against the Imamate of Tahrt, which they founded in southern Ifriqiya. The Aghlabids’ administrative and cultural center was Kairouan; they built the fortified residence of their emirs at Kasr al-Kadim, near Kairouan. In 909 their state succumbed to attacks by the Shiites.

References in periodicals archive ?
Historians and archaeologists offer an interdisciplinary and transregional perspective on the Aghlabid dynasty and ninth-century North Africa to highlight the region's important interchange with other medieval societies in the Mediterranean and beyond.
They also provide for granting unclassified state farmland to unemployed university graduates and holding a small Cabinet meeting on this subject, providing urgent assistance to the newly created municipalities for the acquisition of cleaning equipment (10 million dinars) and granting a million dinars for the launch of a study on the restoration of the Aghlabid basin.
This article will explore the rise of Islam in Sicily under the Aghlabid Dynasty, subsequent Muslim control of the island, and the eventual Norman conquest of the 11th century.
Between the 6th century and the 13th century, this island experienced four radical changes in regime: from Byzantine to Aghlabid to Fatimid to Norman to Swabian.
Chiarelli's History can be divided into two parts: the first is a chronological survey of Muslim Sicily's political history from beginning to end, grafted along Aghlabid, Fatimid, and Kalbid periods, and the second contains three studies, on Sicily's social structure, economy and trade, and Islamic culture.
I will select, from the middle of the book, pages about Qairawan, which contain photos of one of the Aghlabid pools and another of the Great Mosque; then, the Casbah of Algiers and photos of the Ketchaoua Mosque, with its minarets, and the city of Zabid in Yemen, and a photo of the Eastern Shabarek Gate, and the palaces of Wadani, Shanqit and Kshit and the old manuscripts and homes in Mauritania, and the Tadarat Akakus site in Libya, and rock drawings of men dancing, and other geometrical ones in the rock itself.
They and the subsequent Abbasid and Aghlabid rulers promoted Islam and presided over a return to order in Libya where irrigation systems were rebuilt and trade was restored.
The mosque was founded in 732 under the Umayyad dynasty, but the present architectural monument dates back to the Aghlabid dynasty, in the year 864.
Raqqada was the capital of the Aghlabid dynasty, which controlled an area encompassing eastern Algeria, Tunisia and parts of modern day Libya during the 9th century AD.
The Abbasids of Baghdad, in particular, created major mercantile relations with China, via the Silk Route and seaborne trade across the Indian Ocean, with western Russia and the Baltic, and via the southern Mediterranean, with the embryonic Aghlabid emirate of North Africa.
Kreutz deals with the complicated, mixed society of Lombard duchies, Byzantine territories, and independent cities, notably Naples, Gaeta, and Amalfi, from the ninth century when Frankish Political and military influence in the southern half of the Italian peninsula was on the wane and when the region was faced with the new and destructive threat to its security and economy posed after 827 by Aghlabid Sicily.
c]Abbasid province of Ifriqiya and its successor, the Aghlabid amirate.