Aghlabids


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Aghlabids

 

a dynasty of Arabian emirs (800–909) in Ifriqiya, vassals of the caliphate. Its founder was a vice regent appointed by Harun al-Rashid, Ibrahim ibn al-Aghlab (800–812). The Aghlabids fought against the tribes that came forward under the banner of Kharijitism and against the Imamate of Tahrt, which they founded in southern Ifriqiya. The Aghlabids’ administrative and cultural center was Kairouan; they built the fortified residence of their emirs at Kasr al-Kadim, near Kairouan. In 909 their state succumbed to attacks by the Shiites.

References in periodicals archive ?
(TAP) - The police intervened, Wednesday, in Kairouan to clear the main road of the city blocked by protesters of the movement of unemployed graduates "young Aghlabids", who burnt tires.
The Aghlabids and Their Neighbours: Art and Material Culture in Ninth-Century North Africa
Sfax was founded by the Aghlabids dynasty which ruled some parts of northern African and southern Italy between AD 800-909.
Drawing from snippets of information from various sources, Chiarelli introduces him as a scion of the Aghlabids and former governor of Tripoli, who was behind the anti-Fatimid uprisings.
The Fatimids were a Shiite dynasty that capitalized on Sunni grievances which were economic and political in nature to evict the Sunni Aghlabids from North Africa.
This important development, however, did not extend to Southern Italy since, with the Aghlabids' conquest of Sicily during the 9th century, the island entered into the Arab Muslim area of influence.
It was from here that the Aghlabids who ruled Tunisia then launched their successful invasion of Sicily.
The first, and longer, is a political history of the Ibadi communities, their inception and their relation to the growing hostile powers, Aghlabids, Fatimids and Zirids.
Of his six entries under the letter A that are not in the ODB, four are marginal to Byzantium ("Aghlabids," "Alfonso V," "Arles, Council of," "Avitus, Eparchius") and two are rearrangements ("Anchorite," "Anekdota," covered in the ODB under "Hermit," "Prokopios of Caesarea").
It then began to fragment into regional dynasties: in Spain, the Ummayad, 756-1031 A.D.; in Egypt, the Tulunids, 868-905 A.D.; the Fatamids, 969-1171 A.D.; the Ayyubids, 1171-1260 A.D.; in Morocco and Tunisia, the Idrisids, 788-922 A.D.; the Aghlabids, 800-909; the Murabits, 10621145; and the Muwahhids, 1145-1223 A.D..
Closer to home, Ibn Tulun had the example of the Aghlabids of North Africa, with their ongoing project of conquest in Sicily and continental Italy.
In the North African period, the Fatimids, as was true of the Aghlabids who preceded them, benefited substantially from wealth flowing into the realm as a result of military actions--maritime raiding, predominantly--across the Mediterranean along the coasts of southern Italy.