Aglaia


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Aglaia

(ăglā`ə): see GracesGraces,
in Greek mythology, personifications of beauty, charm, and grace; daughters of Zeus and the oceanid Eurynome. Also known as the Charites, they were usually three in number and were called Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne.
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Aglaia

one of the Graces; embodiment of comeliness. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 481]
See: Beauty
References in periodicals archive ?
Their Berlin subsidiary HELLA Aglaia is a global leader in the development of intelligent visual sensor systems with long-standing expertise in mono- and stereo-camera systems, image processing and software programming.
5) Letter from William Morris to Aglaia Coronio, The Collected Letters of William Morris.
Silvestrol a potential anticancer rocaglate derivative from Aglaia foveolata, induces apoptosis in LNCaP cells through the mitochonclri-al/apoptosom.
The company is focused on cosmetics, personal cleaning and personal care products sold under its four major brands targeting the middle to high-end and low-end market, Maysu, Chando, Aglaia and Insea via major distribution channels such as department stores, supermarkets and pharmacies.
Aglaia is a striking new variety with large double white flower.
In Niki de Saint Phalle's exuberent version, Les Trois Graces (1999), Aglaia, Euphrosyne and Thalia take their place in the fast-paced atmosphere of the early 21st century.
The deal, which further strengthens Autoliv's position in the active-safety segment, was signed with the subsidiary Hella Aglaia Mobile Vision GmbH.
An effective, manageable bee for pollination of Rubus bramble fruits, Osmia aglaia.
The compound comes from the Aglaia foveolata tree, found in Sarawak's highlands, and has entered pre-clinical trials.
Aglaia (Beauty), Euphrosyne (Mirth), and Thalia (Abundance) bestow pleasure and generosity on the world, and for ancient authors, the triad also served as an allegory for the cycle of giving, accepting, and returning favours, described by the Roman philosopher Seneca as the 'chief bond of human society'.