agonist

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agonist

[′ag·ə‚nist]
(biochemistry)
A chemical substance that can combine with a cell receptor and cause a reaction or create an active site.
(physiology)
A contracting muscle that is resisted or counteracted by another muscle, called an antagonist, with which it is paired.
References in periodicals archive ?
But aside from occasional observations about presumed audience response, performance is not the focal point here, to such an extent that Samson Agonistes is discussed as a play like the others, despite Milton's own assertion that it "never was intended" for the stage and Elizabeth Sauer's influential work on the poem as closet drama.
Samson Agonistes, like so many of Euripides's plays, is a political drama, in which the issues of sex and politics are inextricably connected, and whose leading female character, Dalila, is a complex woman who, like Euripides's women, is involved in an exceedingly complicated "double" game.
Despite Manoa's concluding promise to build his son a monument, Samson Agonistes leaves its reader with a heap of ruins, a tangled wreckage of bodies and building, and the poem likewise enters into Blake's work in collapse, as a multitude of fragments we can view only serially and collectively, in pieces, but never unified into a single whole.
2007), 98,3 % des 177 patients de son etude atteints de la maladie de Parkinson et de jeu pathologique prenait des agonistes dopaminergiques.
The final chapters move from Paradise Lost to Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes.
Each character is associated with birds, Suibhne through his transformation into a bird-man and Sweeney through his explicit connection to nightingales in "Sweeney among the Nightingales" and The Waste Land as well as to women, possibly prostitutes, in "Sweeney Erect" and Sweeney Agonistes.
Yet Antigone seems a bit out of place in this discussion, as do Caliban and Samson Agonistes in later chapters.
Crank, in Agee Agonistes, "The Body as Sacrifice: The Morning Watch and Ritual Violence" (217-33), explicates with subtlety and complexity an understanding of Agee's writing about religious sensibility and the mind of a young person.
Brief and incisive on the early poems, detailed on the prose writings, Sherwood brings his argument to impressive fruition in his discussion of Milton's post-Restoration poetry, particularly the effect of his publishing Samson Agonistes and Paradise Regained together "to reflect on each other" (306-07).
The controversies over Samson Agonistes reflect the tensions with reading a text whose authority is debated on the basis of its biblical antecedent.
Milton projects his perfect self in the Son in Paradise Regained; the controversial hero of Samson Agonistes is both chosen and profoundly flawed, capturing both sides of Milton's divided self-representations.
Similarly, you can read Milton's Samson Agonistes, leave aside questions on Milton's use of the traditions of the Greek tragedy and ask about Samson as "an urban terrorist".