agonist

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agonist

[′ag·ə‚nist]
(biochemistry)
A chemical substance that can combine with a cell receptor and cause a reaction or create an active site.
(physiology)
A contracting muscle that is resisted or counteracted by another muscle, called an antagonist, with which it is paired.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Before developing these ideas further, however, it is time to address the ideas of agonism and agonistic constitutionalism.
Grounding her theory on the assumption of antagonism's ineradicability, Mouffe redefines democratic politics as agonistic pluralism.
Through an ethnographic examination of these mobilizations, I identify two ideological strands of action--the radical autonomy of the indignados and the agonistic engagement of issue-based platforms that address endangered forms of social reproduction.
The fourth concept is the agonistic dialogue that he sees at the heart of Ghazali: the present's struggle with the tradition through heteroglossia, the privileging of context over text that he draws from Bakhtin.
Coverage includes the behavior of antioxidants and bioantioxidants in chemical and biological media, creation of new biochips, the behavior of enzymes in vitro and in vivo, the use of polymers for radiation treatment, cancer diagnostics, new biotests and methods of chemical and biochemical analysis, increasing trombolitic efficiency, new therapeutic agents, the use of nanotubes in biostimulators, biotechnology of receptions of antidotes, industrial production of vaccines, novel antiulcerogenic factors, analytical methods for the detection of GMOs, neuroprotective properties of agonistics of protease activated receptions, and aspectic controlled release from films.
And while the commercial implies that each over-the top performance of skill is in fact part of an ongoing agonistics between, lite professionals that will have its winners and losers, this is hardly comparable to the significance of an authorised, international sporting contest.
From Nietzsche's (and later George Steiner's) suggestion that tragedy is dead and has been replaced onstage by sappy, redemptive ideologies, to Kaufmann's idea that tragedy lives in its continuum with dark comedy, the ongoing agonistics over the structure of tragedy belie any textbook certainty offered by the likes of Aristotle's Poetics.
"Rhetoric and Competition: Academic Agonistics." Common Knowledge 9.1 (Winter 2003): 42-49.
To make this case she must write literary history in reverse, moving from Shakespeare's Jacobean agonistics to Sidney's Elizabethan wisdom of accommodation.
and civilization": building on this premise, her account of the story Hill similarly focus on how Poe's story reveals "the agonistics of detective fiction as a budding genre," one that "invokes some specific historical tensions of America in the early 1840s" For starters, detective fiction emerges out of "the new phenomenon of larger urban areas that were undergoing a process of refinement and topographical categorization" (1997, 182).