agrarian

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agrarian

a person who favours the redistribution of landed property
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Davidson and Tate were a distinct minority among the Vanderbilt agrarians. Carlson identifies within their thought many of the misconceptions of other twentieth-century agrarians: "a certain hostility toward the very folk they sought to defend; damaging criticism of the Christian faith actually found in rural America; a residual faith in technology; a misplaced belief in the prevailing course of history; and a schizophrenic attitude toward the peasant life."
One of the central illusions that Carlson identifies throughout the work of the New Agrarians is their conviction that the world was tending naturally in the direction of decentralization, with some going so far as to suggest that if only the artificial, state-sanctioned props to the modern industrial order--like special incorporation laws, and even outright subsidies--were removed, agrarianism would flourish once more.
In this section Duncan attempts to create a linkage between classical (Aristotelian) and early modern (Harringtonian) visions of the linkage between property and citizenship and the vision of the agrarians. Unfortunately, the agrarians disappear from large sections of the argument, which left me with the feeling that Duncan forces the connection, relying too much upon analogy and assertion and too little upon textual evidence from the agrarians themselves.
4-6), Duncan takes on the central question for the agrarians, the survival of a specifically southern form of community in the face of industrialization, individualism, and advanced capitalism.
It existed before the Agrarians claimed its mantle and persists unto the present day, consisting of an attack on bourgeois individualism, competition, and progress, and a defense of community, leisure, and tradition.
It is, to begin with, probably the most complete and fair-minded summary we have of what the principal Agrarians said and thought.