Agrigento

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Agrigento

(ägrējān`tō), Lat. Agrigentum, city (1991 pop. 55,283), capital of Agrigento prov., S Sicily, Italy, on a hill above the Mediterranean Sea. It is an agricultural market and a tourist center, but per capita income is among the lowest in Italy. Sulfur and potash are mined. Founded c.580 B.C. as Acragas (or Akragas) by Greek colonists of GelaGela
, city (1991 pop. 61,319), S Sicily, Italy, on the Mediterranean Sea. It is a port, industrial center, and seaside resort. Petrochemicals are produced nearby, and petroleum is refined in the city. Much cotton is grown in Gela's hinterland. The city was founded c.688 B.C.
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, the city became one of the most prosperous in the Greek world, as is indicated by the imposing ruins that remain. It was destroyed c.406 B.C. by Carthage but recovered. During the first of the Punic WarsPunic Wars,
three distinct conflicts between Carthage and Rome. When they began, Rome had nearly completed the conquest of Italy, while Carthage controlled NW Africa and the islands and the commerce of the W Mediterranean.
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 the city suffered at the hands of both the Romans and the Carthaginians. It fell definitively to Rome in 210 B.C. during the Second Punic War. After the fall of Rome, Agrigento passed to the Byzantines and then to the Arabs (9th cent.) and to the Normans (11th cent.). Of note in the city are the remains of several Doric temples (6th–5th cent. B.C.), Roman ruins, Christian catacombs, and archaeological and art museums.

Agrigento

 

Italian city in southern Sicily. It is the administrative center of Agrigento Province, with a population of 51,400 as of 1966. It is a center for the extraction of sulfur, which is shipped from Porto Empedocle. There is an archaeological museum in the city.

Agrigento was founded by Rhodians from Gela in about 582 B.C. (in ancient Greek called Acragas; in Latin, Agrigentum). It was a major trading center of the ancient Mediterranean world. In the period of the Punic Wars it was occupied by the Romans in 262 B.C. During the first Sicilian slave revolt in the second century B.C., the city was an important center of the slave movement. Ruins of the ancient city, including Greek temples of the sixth and fifth centuries B.C., have been preserved.

Agrigento

a town in Italy, in SW Sicily: site of six Greek temples. Pop.: 54 619 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
Principal battles: Agrigentum (Agrigento) (261); Cape Ecnomus (near Licata) (256).
Principal battles: Agrigentum (Agrigento) (255); Panormus (Palermo) (251).
Born about 535 B.C., the son of Deinomenes; appointed tyrant of Gela by his brother Gelon, who had made himself tyrant of Syracuse (485); fought under Gelon at the defeat of the Carthaginian Hamilcar at Himera (480); became tyrant of Syracuse on Gelon's death (478); endeavored to increase his power among the Greek states of southern Italy and Sicily; refounded the abandoned city of Catania in Sicily as Aetna (475); decisively defeated the Etruscans in a great naval battle off Cumae (474), thus ending Etruscan naval power; defeated Thrasydaeus of Agrigentum (Agrigento) and so gained control of most of Sicily; he was known as a patron of the arts, and played host to Simonides, Aeschylus, and Pindar at his court; died in 467, or possibly early 466.
Principal battles: Agrigentum (Agrigento) (456); Placentia (Piacenza) (456); Rome (472).