Ahasuerus


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Ahasuerus

(āhăs'yo͞oē`rəs), Hebrew form of the name Xerxes, as used in the Bible. The Ahasuerus in the Book of Esther is probably Xerxes I. That in the Book of Tobit may be Cyaxares I, destroyer of Nineveh. The name of the father of Darius the MedeDarius the Mede,
in the Bible, a king of the Medes who succeeded to the throne of Babylonia after Belshazzar. Otherwise unknown outside biblical tradition, it is likely that this Darius has been confused with Cyrus the Persian, who succeeded Belshazzar and decreed (539 B.C.
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 is also given as Ahasuerus.

Ahasuerus

(519–465 B.C.) Persian king rectifies wrongs done to Jews. [O.T.: Esther 8:7–8]
See: Justice

Ahasuerus

German name for the Wandering Jew. [Ger. Lit.: Benét, 1071]

Ahasuerus

Old Testament a king of ancient Persia and husband of Esther, generally identified with Xerxes
References in periodicals archive ?
(Others have opted for "Jewishness," "Jewry," and even "Jewdom," the latter etymologically neutral but, to an American ear, grotesque.) Nattiez and his collaborator Marie-Helene Benoit-Otis (who provides new French translations of that essay and five others) render it as "La judeite dans la musique." For "Untergang," Spencer chose "destruction": "But bear in mind that one thing alone can redeem you from the curse that weighs upon you," writes Wagner, addressing the Jews: "the redemption of Ahasuerus: Destruction!" (Spencer, 33).
For example, in asserting that the proximate productions of Marlowe's Jew of Malta and Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice were "an opportunity" for playgoers "to experience plays engaging with anti-Semitism" (133), she does not mention a documented theatrical moment in which a play now lost, "Hester and Ahasuerus," is followed to the stage at Newington the next day by The Jew of Malta (Henslowe's Diary; June 3, 4, 1594).
(The Jew in Romantic literature) may appear as Cain, Ahasuerus, Ancient Mariner, and even Faust...
In the second picture, Poussin's representation of Queen Esther coming into the presence of the Persian King Ahasuerus (Xerxes) to plead for the survival of her people, the exiled Jews, Brude-Firnau, rightly, I think, sees an allusion to an event of crucial importance to Goethe and the entire duchy of Weimar: the interview, on 16 October, between Napoleon and Duchess Luise, in which the duchess defended the conduct of her husband, still absent on campaign with the remnant of the Prussian army, and--according to the story put about by Napoleon himself--persuaded him, by her nobility and strength of character, to allow the duchy to continue in existence.
Here at least two excerpts that refer to the passage of weddings are going to be highlighted: the marriage of Jacob and Rachel and the marriage of King Ahasuerus and Esther.
While none of her Venetian paintings can be securely identified, a survey of her later work indicates that the years in Venice were crucial for Gentileschi's turn from depictions of violence to representations of women contrasted with unexpectedly foolish men, such as Esther Before Ahasuerus of ca.
(21) Kierkegaard lists Don Juan alongside Faust and Ahasuerus, the Wandering Jew.
Alem disso, tal mito teria se fundido, no seculo XVII, a historia do sapateiro judeu Ahasuerus, testemunha imortal da divindade de Cristo, mesclando, entao, a imortalidade com o eterno vagar.
Behind this thought Coleridge must have had in mind the Ahasuerus legend: the Wondering Jew who can never die, living like dead, because he had the audacity to hurry Christ up on the road of Golgotha--his punishment is the painful convergence in his life of both joy and pain, life and death.
Ahasuerus at the Easel: Jewish Art and Jewish Artists in Central and Eastern European Modernism at the Turn of the Last Century
In order to afford a philosophical character to this wandering, Hardy systematically refers to Pierston as "the Wandering Jew" (WB, 225) in "Part Second: A Young Man of Forty" and then the "Jew Ahasuerus" (291) in "Part Third: A Young Man turned Sixty." Michael Irwin draws attention to "the wandering Jew" only to make the denigrating shrug: "Having found the parallel [between Pierston and the 'Wandering Jew'], he [Hardy] chooses not to develop it or not to develop it in remotely predictable terms" (Irwin 2000, 53).
Esther was chosen by Ahasuerus, the King of Persia, to be his queen after his previous queen, Vashti, refused to appear before him during a feast.