Amdahl's law

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Amdahl's law

[′am‚dälz ‚lȯ]
(computer science)
A law stating that the speed-up that can be achieved by distributing a computer program over p processors cannot exceed 1/{f + [1 -f)/ p ]}, where f is the fraction of the work of the program that must be done in serial mode.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Amdahl's Law

(parallel)
(Named after Gene Amdahl) If F is the fraction of a calculation that is sequential, and (1-F) is the fraction that can be parallelised, then the maximum speedup that can be achieved by using P processors is 1/(F+(1-F)/P).

[Gene Amdahl, "Validity of the Single Processor Approach to Achieving Large-Scale Computing Capabilities", AFIPS Conference Proceedings, (30), pp. 483-485, 1967].
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Amdahl's law

"Overall system speed is governed by the slowest component," coined by Gene Amdahl, chief architect of IBM's first mainframe series and founder of Amdahl Corporation and other companies. Amdahl's law applied to networking. The slowest device in the network will determine the maximum speed of the network. See laws.
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