Ahura Mazda

(redirected from Ahura-mazda)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Ahura-mazda: Ormuzd, Ormazd

Ahura Mazda/Ahriman

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Ahura Mazda is the Zoroastrian high god of light. According to tradition, he is using humankind to defeat Ahriman, or Angra Mainyu, the devil figure of darkness, who has come to Earth to tempt humans away from the light. A battle of light and darkness, good and evil, is being waged that will end at the last judgment, when light will triumph and a new, purified Earth will enter into its prophesied eternal age of destiny.

The Religion Book: Places, Prophets, Saints, and Seers © 2004 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ahura Mazda

 

the supreme god in a number of ancient and early medieval Iranian religions in Southwest and Middle Asia, as well as in the ancient Armenian pantheon, some syncretic Hellenistic cults, and so forth. Today Ahura Mazda is still recognized by the Parsees and the Gabars. In the ancient Persian religion the supreme (but not the sole) god Ahura Mazda was the creator of the sky, the earth, and man, and also the protector of the king and the guarantor of public law and order. In the Gathas by Zarathustra, Ahura Mazda is a single god with the functions of the principal ancient gods, and in the Young Avesta he is the head of a new pantheon of gods. With the development of dualistic notions about the age-old struggle between the principles of good and evil, Ahura Mazda came to be associated with good, in opposition to Angra Mainyu. The modern Zoroas-trians, the Parsees, recognize only the one good god Ahura Mazda (Ormazd) and understand Angra Mainyu (Ahriman) to be essentially only a symbol of the evil tendencies in man.

E. A. GRANTOVSKII

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Ahura Mazda

(Ormuzd, Ormazd) the spirit of good and creator of all things. [Zoroastrianism: Payton, 11]
See: God
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.