Aimaks

(redirected from Aimaq)
Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Aimaks

 

(Chaar-Aimaks), a group of peoples living in the northwest and central regions of Afghanistan.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is the mother tongue of ethnic Tajiks, Hazara and Aimaq as well as the second language of government.
Dilawar Aimaq, a lawmaker from Baghlan, told Arab News that the team was possibly seized by a criminal gang and sold to the Taliban.
Turkmen (3%), Aimaq (4%), Baluch (2%), and small communities of Brahui, Nuristani, Pashaie, Pamiri, Khirgiz, and Qizilbash are also represented.
Agriculture Director Azizullah Aimaq said local authorities had urged all departments to help clean the canal.
Taiba Aimaq (8) was seriously injured in an explosion at her house in the Afghan city of Mazar-i-Sharif, but was unable to get the necessary treatment for her burns because of a lack of medical supplies.
Safia Aimaq, the representative of Badghis in Parliament calls the situation in the province worrying.
Fazal Karim Aimaq. In light of the understanding reached at the inaugural meeting of the Joint Commission at the heads of government level held on 11 June 2011 in Islamabad, substantive deliberations were held at meeting in a cordial and constructive manner on a number of relevant aspects relating to the Afghan-led peace and reconciliation efforts with a view to ensuring its success.
After they reached Daulatyar, people referred to him an Aimaq dog, a special mastiff that was chronicled in the eleventh century as "a remarkably fine breed of dogs in Ghor so powerful that in frame and strength every one of them is a match for a lion." Further, they were such an important part of Islamic culture, that one scholar wrote, "Avicenna could not fight with a dog from Ghor" (182).
TAJALA Aimaq used to build schools and hospitals in Afghanistan.
Main ethnic groups: Pashtun, Tajik, Hazara, Uzbek, Turkmen, Aimaq, Baluch, Nuristani, Kizilbash.
They are estimated to consist of about 38 per cent Pashtun inhabitants, Tajik 25 per cent, Hazara 19 per cent, Uzbek 12 per cent, Aimaq four per cent and Baluchi 0,5 per cent.
The next largest groups are the Hazaras, Uzbeks and Aimaq. Both spatial and ethnic impenetrability has prevented Afghanistan from ever forming a consensual and coherent sense of nationalism.