Aeneas

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Related to Aineias: Aeneas, Æneas

Aeneas

(ē`nēəs, ĭnē`–), palsied man whom Peter cured in the Acts of the Apostles.

Aeneas

(ĭnē`əs), in Greek mythology, a Trojan, son of AnchisesAnchises
, in Greek mythology, member of the ruling family of Troy; father of Aeneas by Aphrodite. When Anchises boasted of the goddess's love, Zeus crippled or, in some versions of the legend, blinded him.
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 and Aphrodite. After the fall of Troy he escaped, bearing his aged father on his back. He stayed at Carthage with Queen Dido, then went to Italy, where his descendants founded Rome. The deeds of Aeneas are the substance of the great Roman epic, the Aeneid of VergilVergil
or Virgil
(Publius Vergilius Maro) , 70 B.C.–19 B.C., Roman poet, b. Andes dist., near Mantua, in Cisalpine Gaul; the spelling Virgil is not found earlier than the 5th cent. A.D. Vergil's father, a farmer, took his son to Cremona for his education.
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.

Aeneas

Trojan hero; legendary founder of Roman race. [Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
See: Heroism

Aeneas

carried his father Anchises from burning Troy. [Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
See: Loyalty
References in periodicals archive ?
(56) When Aineias throws a spear at Achilleus in Book 20, the spear cannot penetrate the shield.
(dis)appears, precisely, as a simulacrum: "Aineias himself and ...
Apart from her relationship with Aineias, Kassandra either dislikes or is ambivalent toward sex and does essentially what is expected of her.
David Whitehead (tr.), Aineias the Tactician: How to Survive under Siege (Oxford, 1990), is a work with useful notes and up-to-date bibliography.
Aineias the Tactician, author of the earliest surviving Western volume devoted to military strategy (How to Survive Under Siege, written in the mid-fourth century B.C.), was primarily concerned with how leaders should deploy available manpower and other resources to best advantage.
by far first rose up [??] the lord of men Eumelos Admetos' own son [??] he was excellent at horsemanship and after him [??] Tydeus' son rose up [??] strong Diomedes and he harnessed Trojan horses [??] he once seized them from Aineias [??] though the man himself was rescued by Apollo.
Farnell, among those who received these honours the following sub-groups can be discerned: 'heroes of divine or daimonic origin' (such as Trophonius, Linus, Ino-Leucothea); 'sacral heroes' (Aineias, Iphigeneia, Amphiaraus, Melampous); 'functional heroes', whose names are in fact nothing more than appellative epithets; and also Heracles, the Dioscuroi, Asclepius, each of whom is taken as a category in his own right; the heroes of the Homeric epics; and, finally, historical figures who became objects of a hero-cult.(23)
Aineias loses his chario Oileus and Sarpedon lose their lives as well.