air bag

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air bag:

see automobileautomobile,
self-propelled vehicle used for travel on land. The term is commonly applied to a four-wheeled vehicle designed to carry two to six passengers and a limited amount of cargo, as contrasted with a truck, which is designed primarily for the transportation of goods and
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air bag

[′er ‚bag]
(mechanical engineering)
An automotive vehicle passenger safety device consisting of a passive restraint in the form of a bag which is automatically inflated with gas to provide cushioned protection against the impact of a collision.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although air bags can cause facial injuries to anyone wearing glasses, for example, these and other minor injuries from air bags are a small price to pay for avoiding a crushed head or chest.
By then, it may be too late because air bags have not fired or are in the process of filling, possibly adding to injuries from the crash.
Toyota on Monday recalled passenger air bags in 247,000 old vehicles that included the Corolla, Lexus SC, Matrix, Tundra and Sequoia.
According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), air bags have saved 5,658 lives since their introduction in the late 1980s.
The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety argued that "the proposed warning could mislead the public by implying that air bags can cause fatal or serious injuries that would not have occurred in a comparable vehicle without an air bag," even though that was exactly the case.
As the lowest priced car in the United States, the $8,079 Accent is a 2-door hatchback featuring dual air bags, a 92-horsepower 4-cylinder engine and a 5-speed manual transmission.
To obtain effective safety-belt laws now, without denying the public this ultimate protection of air bags, insurers and safety groups strongly recommend that each state considering belt laws include a legislative statement of intent.
According to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, nearly 20,000 lives have been saved by air bags deploying in an accident.
Deploying air bags have been clocked up to 300 mph; most deploy between 200 and 300 mph.
Air bags have prevented far more injuries than they have caused.
Optional anti-lock brakes and traction control plus standard dual air bags add a large measure of safety.
Nevertheless, air bags offer only limited protection against neuromusculoskeletal injuries, such as cracked ribs.