air-fuel ratio

(redirected from Air to fuel ratio)

air-fuel ratio

[′er ′fyül ‚rā·shō]
(chemistry)
The ratio of air to fuel by weight or volume which is significant for proper oxidative combustion of the fuel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

air-fuel ratio

The ratio of the volume (or weight) of air being furnished for combustion to the volume (or weight) of the fuel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is clearly due to the different air to fuel ratio of the two cases: the higher O2 concentration in stoichiometric condition promotes the oxidation rate of fuel hydrocarbons.
Additionally, intercoolers play a vital role in helping meet fuel economy standards by supplying the engine with adequate oxygen to maintain air to fuel ratio ensuring proper combustion.
Turbochargers utilize the exhaust gases from the engine to compress the air and feed it back to the engine to create a better air to fuel ratio. This generates a better combustion and provides a boost for the vehicle.
1976), the lower heating value of the blends ([LHV.sub.b]), the stoichiometric air to fuel ratio (AFR) (Heywood 1988), the Saponification Number (SN) and the IV (Kalayasiri et al.
The engine brake power, brake specific fuel consumption, brake thermal efficiency and air to fuel ratio were calculated.
While the equivalence air to fuel ratio and the brake thermal efficiency are lower by about of 5.2% and 1.8%, respectively (Table 4).
The air to fuel ratio is around 1.2 at no load condition and at peak load it is 1.5.
It can be seen that the air to fuel ratio is around 1.2 at no load condition and at the peak load it is maintained at around 1.5.
Charge air temperatures and volume, together with air to fuel ratio and compression ratio, are constantly monitored.
By reducing the throat and the diameter of the air entry region, the combustion volume may be made smaller thus causing the air to fuel ratio to tend towards the stoichiometric ratio and the temperature of the combustion zone to rise.
Moreover, the time of quiescence enhances the mixing of air and fuel, limiting any spatial differences of the air to fuel ratio inside the vessel as can be the case in SI engines.