visual flight

(redirected from Aircraft control)

visual flight

[′vizh·ə·wəl ′flīt]
(aerospace engineering)
An aircraft flight occurring under conditions which allow navigation by visual reference to the earth's surface at a safe altitude and with sufficient horizontal visibility, and operating under visual flight rules. Also known as VFR flight.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new concept for aircraft control removes the conventional need for complex, mechanical moving parts used to move flaps to control the aircraft during flight.
He also used developed flow as an alternative to the use of aircraft control surfaces.
The number of Canadian soldiers in Iraq estimated to / 110 / soldiers to train Kurdish fighters for their contribution to aircraft control / CB -140 Aurora / and aircraft refueling / CC -150 Polaris T /.
He was a veteran of the Vietnam War, serving as an aircraft control and warning radar operator.
An AOA system's output will help pilots maintain aircraft control "regardless of weight, airspeed, bank angle, density altitude, configuration, or center of gravity," Oord said.
Shanor then performed a flawless approach and three-engine landing, in which precise aircraft control was required due to adverse yaw caused by the failed engine.
This old Boeing 707 design has a great feature in that no hydraulics are required for aircraft control surfaces (it's all mechanical cables).
in 1974 and served as an Aircraft Control and Warning Radar technician in Alaska and Mississippi.
MONTGOMERY AND THE DAWN OF AVIATION IN THE WEST re-considers the history of American aviation and provides the story of not the two brothers (which resulted from a public campaign the Wright waged to profit from their patent) but upon the scientist whose research into the laws of flight resulted in inventions of the basic methods of aircraft control and stability.
Harris (HFI Solutions Ltd, UK) presents a systemic overview of the role of human factors in aviation, covering scientific understandings of human information processing, workload, situation awareness, decision making, error, and individual differences; human-associated issues of pilot selection, training and simulation, stress, fatigue, alcohol, and environmental stressors; machine-associated factors such as display design, aircraft control, automation, and human-computer interaction on the flight deck; and managerial issues such as flight deck safety management, airline safety management, and incident and accident investigation.
At about 1005 Eastern time, the airplane collided with terrain following an in-flight loss of aircraft control.
Don't compare fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft control systems and their requirements.

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