aircraft

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aircraft

any machine capable of flying by means of buoyancy or aerodynamic forces, such as a glider, helicopter, or aeroplane
www.aerospaceweb.org/aircraft/index.shtml

aircraft

[′er‚kraft]
(aerospace engineering)
Any structure, machine, or contrivance, especially a vehicle, designed to be supported by the air, either by the dynamic action of the air upon the surfaces of the structure or object or by its own buoyancy. Also known as air vehicle.

Aircraft

Any vehicle which carries one or more persons and which navigates through the air. The two main classifications of aircraft are lighter-than-air and heavier-than-air. The term lighter-than-air is applied to all aircraft which sustain their weight by displacing an equal weight of air, for example, blimps and dirigibles. Heavier-than-air craft are supported by giving the surrounding air a momentum in the downward direction equal to the weight of the aircraft. See Airplane, Helicopter

aircraft

Any structure, vehicle, or machine designed to travel through air supported by its own buoyancy or by the action of air on its surfaces. It includes airplanes, gliders, helicopters, and balloons. It does not include hovercraft, which obtain their lift from the reaction of air against the earth's surface. ICAO defines aircraft as “any machine that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reaction of the air other than the reaction of the air against the earth's surface.” Aircraft has also been defined as “device(s) that are used or intended to be used for flight in the air, and when used in air traffic control terminology, may include the flight crew” (“AIM,” FAA).
References in periodicals archive ?
During the regime of former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, two aircrafts were taken on lease from Czechoslovakian companies Smart Wing and Travel Service.
A Category 2 status meant those countries had to lease aircraft off category 1 nations to fly to the US.
The procedure required removing the engines and APUs from the aircraft; the taxpayer frequently replaced these parts with components that had recently completed the ESV process.
To control the sturdier aircraft, designers added movable panels to the ends of those stiffwings.
When its West Coast FRS counterpart, VAW-110, was disestablished in September 1994, the squadron acquired additional aircraft, personnel and responsibility.
It cannot be said that the NAC management might be looking for such rejected aircrafts at present.
In Situation 1, the taxpayer incurred $2 million to perform a D check on the airframe of an aircraft acquired in 1984 for $15 million (excluding engines).
By keeping grounded the aircraft, NAC is losing 10 million rupees interest amount every day.
Much of the public's attention is devoted to such major aircraft accidents as Valujet's Flight 592, which crashed into the Florida Everglades on May 11, 1996, killing 110 passengers and crew.
[ClickPress, Tue Aug 27 2019] Aircraft anchoring systems are also known as aircraft tiedowns, especially in western countries.

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