Airedale

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Airedale

a large rough-haired tan-coloured breed of terrier characterized by a black saddle-shaped patch covering most of the back
References in periodicals archive ?
Club secretary Wendy Turner said: "When the Airedales found a body that still had life about it, they lifted something such as a cap and ran back to the stretcher-bearers and guided them out to where the person was."
Though the magazine has run articles on hunting Airedales in the past, this is the first time an Airedale has been on the cover.
The breeds that mostly have the right blood group for donation are Airedales, American bulldogs, boxers, mastiffs, German shepherds, English bull-terriers, English pointers, flatcoated retrievers, Dobermans, greyhounds, lurchers and Weimaraners.
Tosh delighted in his Airedale dogs, opening his home to rescued Airedales for the past 16 years, always stating they had rescued him.
But the Airedales haven't been their dominating selves since legendary coach Frank Vines retired.
Marilyn Monroe's (the dog in COUNTRYSIDE), morn is black and tan; the first time I took her to the vet he said "Airedale, huh?," and then he told me how Northwest Farm Terriers were replacing Airedales in this area with regards to cougar and bear control.
We own two Airedales and were pleased to read Chris Dorsey's Gun Dogs column in the April 1999 issue, "The return of the Airedale." We can attest to the fitness of Airedales in the field and to their faithful companionship; ours are with us almost constantly, often helping out with ranch chores.
guard dogs were "Alsatians, Airedales, and Doberman
Stephanie and husband Mark, from Spalding, Lincs, have bred and shown Airedales for 26 years.
Since then, Airedales and other breeds of dog have played a vital role in conflicts including World War II and the Gulf War.
"My dad 'brainwashed' me into thinking that Airedales are the best breed because they could do everything--hunt, guard the family and still have the temperament to be part of the family rather than living out in a kennel or in the barn, as so many other hunting or farm dogs did in those days," she recalls.
Oh, a few diehards bred, raised and used their Airedales as hunters, but they were few and far between, even in the Airedale community.