aeronautics

(redirected from Airspace Rights)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

aeronautics:

see aerodynamicsaerodynamics,
study of gases in motion. As the principal application of aerodynamics is the design of aircraft, air is the gas with which the science is most concerned. Although aerodynamics is primarily concerned with flight, its principles are also used in designing automobile
..... Click the link for more information.
; airplaneairplane,
 aeroplane,
or aircraft,
heavier-than-air vehicle, mechanically driven and fitted with fixed wings that support it in flight through the dynamic action of the air.
..... Click the link for more information.
; aviationaviation,
operation of heavier-than-air aircraft and related activities. Aviation can be conveniently divided into military aviation, air transport, and general aviation.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

aeronautics

[‚e·rə′nȯd·iks]
(fluid mechanics)
The science that deals with flight through the air.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

aeronautics

The science of aerial locomotion and the production apparatus of flight, both piloted and unpiloted, or the study of travel through the earth's atmosphere. The science of aeronautics essentially studies design, construction, and operation of aircraft within the earth's atmosphere. For studies involving travel in space, there is a separate branch called astronautics.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

aeronautics

the study or practice of all aspects of flight through the air
www.sae.org/technology/aerospace.htm
www.aeronautics.ru/links.htm
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
treatment of airspace rights exists in part because modern regulatory
least one other commentator has argued that airspace rights receive
per se "physical takings" of airspace rights under current law
reluctant to designate airspace rights alone as the
declined to isolate airspace rights from the fee estate for purposes of
interests such as airspace rights from the fee estate for purposes of
(123.) The Penn Central case, which focused on airspace rights, emphasizes that such evidence of deprivation is a basic requirement under the Takings Clause.