Ajowan


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Ajowan

 

(Trachyspermum), a genus of plants of the Urn-belliferae family. About 20 species of ajowan flourish in Africa and Asia. The fragrant ajowan (azhgon and Indian caraway—Latin names, Trachyspermum ammi and Carum ajowan) is an annual plant which is the strain of greatest commercial interest. The stalk stands erect and is ramose. The leaves are bipinnatifid or tripinnatifid, with finely cut distal lobules. The plant has small, white or violet flowers in a complex umbel. The fruits are small and ovate and have a strong characteristic fragrance and a somewhat rough texture because of numerous bladder-like patillae. The natural homeland of the fragrant ajowan is India, where it has been cultivated for a long time. In addition, it is cultivated in North Africa, East Africa, Argentina, Iran, Afghanistan, and Asia Minor, and since 1934 in the USSR (in Middle Asia) for the production of essential oils. Its fruits contain 2.5–10 percent essential oil, 15–30 percent fatty oil, and about 15 percent proteins. The essential oil contains up to 50 percent thymol, which has strong antiseptic properties.

REFERENCE

Atlas lekarstvennykh rastenii SSSR. Moscow, 1962.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gram positive bacteria were observed to be more sensitive as compare to gram negative bacteria for ajowan clove and orange oil whereas responses of both types of bacteria for eucalyptus oil were not statistically different (Table 3).
aeruginosa with Ajowan oil recorded in present study was only 12 mm as compared to 28 mm for P.
Antiseptic ajowan oil is made from it; also called Javanese seed, ajava.
Herbs and spices as natural antimicrobials in foods, and the effect of their natural antioxidants on the shelf life of food are explored, before the book goes on to look in depth at individual herbs and spices, ranging from ajowan to tamarind.
Following an overview of these seasonings' applications, Teuscher (a German scientist) presents some 100 monographs describing the cultivation of herbs and spices from ajowan to white mustard, their commercial production, chemical structure, pharmacological action, traditional uses, potential toxicity, affinities with other spices, and related plants.
Rinse fillets, pat dry and season each very lightly with salt and ajowan.