Aklavik


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Aklavik

(ăklä`vĭk), settlement (1991 pop. 801), Northwest Territories, Canada, on the west channel of the Mackenzie River. The unsuitability of the land at the site led to the construction of InuvikInuvik
, town (1991 pop. 3,206), Northwest Territories, Canada, on the east channel of the Mackenzie River. It was built (1954–62) as a new townsite for Aklavik and was the first model town in the Canadian Arctic. A satellite operations station and airport are there.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Taii Trigwatsii (Breaking Trails) project will receive $4,553,065 and will help participants in the Gwichin communities of Inuvik, Fort McPherson, Aklavik and Tsiigehtchic.
Inuvialuit food use and food preferences in Aklavik, Northwest Territories, Canada.
Five doubled as volunteer-run broadcasters: Whitehorse (CFWH) and Dawson City (CFYT) in Yukon Territory, along with Aklavik (CHAK), Hay River (CFHR), and Norman Wells (CFNW) in the Northwest Territories.
The Firths, members of the Gwich'in First Nation, were born in Aklavik in the Northwest Territories.
When she was nine years old, Teya and her younger sister went to a residential school in Aklavik, N.
After marriage in Ottawa in 1919 he returned to the new community of Aklavik on the Mackenzie Delta, met Vilhjalmur Stefansson, and took an interest in the Government's developing program to stimulate domestic caribou herding for the resident populations.
So I spend a lot of time in Fort McPherson and I attend a lot of events there and in the community of Aklavik.
Nous devons surveiller notre budget et comme je dois prendre l'avion pour me rendre a Aklavik, je dois vraiment choisir le bon moment pour y aller; par contre, on peut toutefois circuler en voiture l'hiver et cela aide beaucoup.
French herself detracts from her story about her seven-year-long attendance of the Anglican Boarding School in Aklavik (in the 1930s and 1940s) by her dedication:
The media reported that ticket books were sold on Jennie to places as far away as Vancouver, Montreal, San Francisco, and Aklavik.
For two long years, Margaret Pokiak endured life at the residential school in Aklavik, years vividly relived in her memoir, Fatty Legs (CCBN, Winter 2011), dreaming of reunion with her family on Banks Island.
On a trip to Aklavik with her father, Margaret is mesmerized by the dark-cloaked nuns and the pale-skinned priests.