acrasia

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acrasia

[ə′krā·zē·ə]
(psychology)
Lack of self-control.

Acrasia

self-indulgent in the pleasures of the senses. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
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After all, Socrates does not describe akrasia in detail; he leaves listeners to flesh out his sketch.
Alfred Mele reprocha a Frankfurt no dar cuenta de los fenomenos de continencia e incontinencia, porque la akrasia implica romper un compromiso y el deseo de segundo nivel no implica ningun compromiso (1992: 283-288).
We use their akrasia as evidence of their possession of character traits on which we pass independent judgment --sloth, gluttony, greed, narcissism, cowardice, etc.
On the topic of rationality in the play, see also the argument of Rickert 1987 against akrasia in Medea's motivation.
Toda la filosofia de la accion contemporanea se ha preocupado por este problema, que se manifiesta en formas danadas de agencia como el autoengano, la akrasia o la mala fe sartriana, en las que se desvela una tension interna entre partes del yo que actuan en niveles diferentes de conciencia.
The second example is George Nakhnikian's approach that says Socrates denies akrasia by affirming psychological egoism, but he fails in supporting his position.
Akrasia in Greek Philosophy: From Socrates to Plotinus, Brill, 2007, 119-38), sets out to analyze Plato's notion of enkrateia, and to explain why enkrateia does not feature in Plato's early dialogues but becomes prominent in Gorgias and the Republic.
It is a world where performance is all, and weariness, the weariness of the self, has long set in; where a Beckettian akrasia is now a circuit-disconnect between wiring and neurotransmission in the brain and wiring and neurotransmission to the muscles of the body.
My aim in reconstructing this argument has been to defend the internal coherency of (at least) that precise aspect of Epictetus' conception of human agency, as well as call attention to the idea of the different degrees of 'availability' of our beliefs or opinions, an idea that has not been carefully analyzed so far and which can become an important element in our understanding of other aspects of Epictetus' psychology, mainly of his conception of akrasia.
Three that are quite salient in the New Testament are the concept of forgiveness as directed by one human being (the victim of an offense) to another (the perpetrator of the offense) and the correlate of repenting and asking forgiveness; the Pauline conception of the divided self (the new anthropos and the old anthropos in struggle for supremacy); and the Pauline-Augustinian conception of weakness of will, which is similar to but quite distinct from the Aristotelian notion of akrasia.
In her essay "Shakespeare and Prudential Psychology: Ambition and Akrasia in Macbeth," Unhae Langis brings out the classical sense of virtue as activity and self-command.
Del mismo modo, los casos clasicos de irracionalidad como la debilidad de la voluntad o akrasia, el auto-engano, la procrastinacion, el creer basado en el deseo (wishful thinking), etc.