Capp

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Capp

Al, full name Alfred Caplin. 1909--79, US cartoonist, famous for his comic strip Li'l Abner
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Even before the accident, Capp had a tough row to hoe, as biographer Michael Schumacher and former underground comics publisher Denis Kitchen reveal in their fine new biography Al Capp: A Life to the Contrary.
Fisher and his assistants--including Al Capp before he started his Li'l Abner strip--presented Joe in a variety of boxing adventures.
LEAP Year day is known as Sadie Hawkins Day in the US after the spinster from Al Capp's Li'l Abner comic strip.
The items include the work of Dan Piraro ("Bizarro"/King Features Syndicate), editorial cartoonist Doug Marlette (Tulsa World/Tribune Media Services), Jack and Carole Bender ("Alley Oop"/United Media), the late editorial cartoonist Bill Mauldin, the late Al Capp ("L'il Abner"), the late Zack Mosley ("Buck Rogers"), and others.
There are probably as few people around these days who remember Al Capp's cartoon character Joe Btfsplk--so dogged by misfortune that he had his own personal raincloud hovering over him--as there are contemporary art scenesters who know who Oscar Bluemner was.
And so this rueful Old Lefty discovers a disconcerting empathy for Al Capp. The Li'l Abner artist became the hero of the Left when he deployed his Dogpatch characters against McCarthyism.
To wit: A child of five could do that; art ought to be beautiful; and, as Al Capp put it, "abstract art is a product of the untalented, sold by the unprincipled to the utterly bewildered."
It was usually the whites and the blacks who were seeking separation from each other, though any examination of American culture would show that they couldn't do without each other and that the blacks had become a sort of Schmoo of American culture, Al Capp's creature, who was an all-purpose thing.
They brought the sharpened perspective and the moral anxiety of the outsider to this artistic expression, and, from Rube Goldberg to Al Capp, Will Eisner, and Art Spiegelman, to mention only several of the giants, they have strongly influenced the cartoon arts.
Some of you might be old enough to remember the Eisenhower presidency (in the 1950s) when the then secretary of defence stated, "What's good for General Motors is good for the country." (He was a former General Motors executive and remained a shareholder.) Al Capp, the L'il Abner comic strip creator, parodied this event, creating a blustering, overbearing character called General Bullmoose who proclaimed, "What's good for General Bullmoose is good for the country!" General Bullmoose rides again!
Anyone who remembers the Dogpatch characters created by the late cartoonist Al Capp will probably remember Joe Btfsplk.
CAN anyone send me information, articles, material on the life and career of American cartoonist Al Capp (1909-79), the creator of the Li'l Abner-Yokum cartoon strip?