Aladdin's lamp

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Aladdin’s lamp

when rubbed, genie appears to do possessor’s bidding. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights, “Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp”]
See: Fantasy

Aladdin’s lamp

when rubbed, genie appears, grants possessor’s wishes. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights]
See: Magic
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Aladdin replied: "The Sultan, as thou knowest, has broken his promise to me, and the vizir's son is to have the princess.
Aladdin then went to his chamber, where, sure enough at midnight the genie transported the bed containing the vizir's son and the princess.
Whereupon the genie took the vizir's son out of bed, leaving Aladdin with the princess.
"Fear nothing," Aladdin said to her; "you are my wife, promised to me by your unjust father, and no harm shall come to you."
The princess was too frightened to speak, and passed the most miserable night of her life, while Aladdin lay down beside her and slept soundly.
When the three months were over, Aladdin sent his mother to remind the Sultan of his promise.
The Sultan then turned to Aladdin's mother, saying: "Good woman, a Sultan must remember his promises, and I will remember mine, but your son must first send me forty basins of gold brimful of jewels, carried by forty black slaves, led by as many white ones, splendidly dressed.
She gave Aladdin the message, adding: "He may wait long enough for your answer!"
Aladdin made them set out to the palace, two and two, followed by his mother.
They entered the palace, and, after kneeling before the Sultan, stood in a half-circle round the throne with their arms crossed, while Aladdin's mother presented them to the Sultan.
She lost no time in telling Aladdin, bidding him make haste.
Aladdin mounted his horse and passed through the streets, the slaves strewing gold as they went.