Alamanni

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Alamanni

 

(or Alemanni), a Germanic tribe first mentioned at the beginning of the third century A.D. and believed to be descended from the Semnones and other Germanic tribes of the Suebic people. In the third century the Alamanni broke through the frontier of the Roman Empire between the Rhine and Danube, and in the fifth century they settled in the territory of modern southwestern Germany, Alsace, and eastern Switzerland. In 496 the Franks subdued the greater part of the Alamanni and in 536 overcame the rest. However, in the beginning the Alamanni retained their dukes, and from 679 to 709 the Alamannic duchy was independent. The region settled by the Alamanni was ruled by Alamannic law. In the tenth century the tribal duchy of Alamannia, or Swabia, was formed as part of the kingdom of Germany. The Alamanni, or Swabians, were an important component of the German nation. In a number of European languages, the names for Germany and Germans are derived from the name “Alamanni.”

References in periodicals archive ?
20, where this remark is also explained as a result of Ammianus' dislike of Alamanns and his admiration of Agilo's predecessor Ursicinus.
Ammianus does not tell us directly, but in 358 Julian sent the tribunus scutariorum Nestica to capture an Alamann to act as a guide for his army against the Alamannic king Hortarius (Amm.
He was an Alamann, and had been one of those accused with Scudilo of passing information to the enemy in 354, at which time he had been tribunus stabuli.