Alans

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Related to Alan: Alan Turing, Alan Walker

Alans

or

Alani:

see SarmatiaSarmatia
, ancient district between the Vistula River and the Caspian Sea, gradually conquered and occupied by the Sarmatians [Lat. Sarmatae] or Sauromatians (a term used by Herodotus and now used by archaeologists for early Sarmatians) from the 6th cent. B.C.
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References in classic literature ?
There are many incidents given in the trial that point to Alan's fiery spirit and Highland quickness to take offence.
I have in my possession a paper, yellow with age, that was sent soon after the novel appeared, containing "The Pedigree of the Family of Appine," wherein it is said that "Alan 3rd Baron of Appine was not killed at Flowdoun, tho there, but lived to a great old age.
But if you tried me on the point of Alan's guilt or innocence, I think I could defend the reading of the text.
After a strained moment of silence, he leaned across and said, very quietly, but watching the effect of each word upon the face of him he had sent for, "Alan, in a locked room at the top of this house, a room to which nobody but myself has access, a dead man is seated at a table.
Only listen, Alan. All I ask of you is to perform a certain scientific experiment.
"I am so sorry for you, Alan," he murmured, "but you leave me no alternative.
Of all youth's passions and pleasures, this is the most common and least alloyed; and every flash of Alan's black eyes; every aspect of his curly head; every graceful reach, every easy, stand-off attitude of waiting; ay, and down to his shirt-sleeves and wrist-links, were seen by John through a luxurious glory.
Before they parted, Alan made a proposal that was startling in the extreme.
In precisely the same spirit as a man may debate a project to ascend the Matterhorn or to cross Africa, John considered Alan's proposal, and, greatly daring, accepted it.
Beebe was not able to tell the ladies of his adventure at Modena, where the chambermaid burst in upon him in his bath, exclaiming cheerfully, "Fa niente, sono vecchia." He contented himself with saying: "I quite agree with you, Miss Alan. The Italians are a most unpleasant people.
Miss Alan did not follow, but gathered that she was being mocked in an agreeable way.
Beebe," said Miss Alan, divided between awe and mirth.