symptom

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symptom

Med any sensation or change in bodily function experienced by a patient that is associated with a particular disease

Symptom

 

an indication of a phenomenon, for example, of a disease. Many types of symptoms are distinguished in medicine. Constitutional symptoms characterize diseases of varying genesis and include weakness and increases in body temperature. Pathognomonic symptoms indicate a definite nosologic form; a stabbing pain in the epigastric region, for example, is typical of a perforating gastric ulcer. Subjective symptoms are only revealed upon questioning the individual, and objective symptoms are readily observable through examination, palpation, percussion, auscultation, and laboratory and instrumental diagnostic methods. Signal symptoms are the precursors of a disease. They include early symptoms, such as chest pains with pneumonia, and late symptoms, such as peritoneal irritation with cholecystitis.

A disease is said to be atypical if its characteristic symptoms are absent from the very beginning; an example of an atypical disease is the painless form of myocardial infarction. Modern therapeutic measures and protective inoculations can substantially alter the symptoms of a disease and even cause them to disappear. Diagnosis and prognosis are based on a knowledge of all of the symptoms of a disease.

symptom

[′sim·təm]
(medicine)
A phenomenon of physical or mental disorder or disturbance which leads to complaints on the part of the patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
Major Finding: Clinical management changes were made based on endoscopy findings in 41% of the 39 children who had alarm symptoms and in 59% of the 53 who did not.
15) It is also important to ask how long the patient has experienced heartburn and to confirm the presence of alarm symptoms because endoscopy is recommended for patients who have had GERD symptoms for several years and for those who are currently experiencing alarm symptoms.
An extensive and expensive evaluation for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be avoided if your patient is aged <50 years and is not experiencing alarm symptoms (hematochezia, 10 lbs weight loss, fever, anemia, nocturnal or severe diarrhea), has not recently taken antibiotics, and has no family history of colon cancer.
Cash (21) found the pretest probability of inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer, and infectious diarrhea is less than 1% among IBS patients without alarm symptoms (Table 2).
Those under 50 years of age who have no alarm symptoms can forgo further testing.
patients with alarm symptoms or failure to respond to 4 to 8 weeks of therapy with a proton pump inhibitor.
In addition to the alarm symptoms provided (Table), I also become more concerned if patients have tobacco or alcohol problems, or require chronic proton pump inhibitor therapy ([is greater than] 12 weeks) to control their symptoms.
Alarm symptoms include dysphagia, gastrointestinal bleeding, acute abdominal pain, jaundice, or an abdominal mass.
The most recent American, Canadian, and European consensus-based guidelines all recommend that patients younger than 45 years with dyspepsia and no alarm symptoms should be tested for H pylori infection and then given eradication therapy if positive; patients older than 45 years and those with alarm symptoms should have prompt endoscopy.
Patients aged older than 45 years, those exhibiting any alarm symptoms (eg, weight loss, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, dysphagia), and those with a recent history of treatment for H pylori were excluded.