Alaungpaya

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Alaungpaya

(əlŏng`pāyä), 1711–60, Burmese king, founder of the Konbaung dynasty, which ruled until 1885. His name, also given as Alompra, means "the coming Buddha." The son of a village headman, he rallied the Burmese and led them against their Mons rulers. He seized the important town of Innwa (Ava) in 1753 and moved south, uniting upper and lower Myanmar under his rule. Pursuing the Mons, he invaded Siam but was wounded in a siege of Ayuthia and died while returning to Myanmar.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Alaungpaya

 

Born 1714; died 1760. Burmese ruler from 1752. Founder of the Konbaung dynasty. Alaungpaya, a feudal lord of the Shwebo region, led the struggle of the Burmese against Mon rule in 1752. In 1754, Alaungpaya captured Ava, and by 1755 he had subjugated all of Upper and Central Burma. In honor of his victories, the city of Rangoon was established in 1754. Alaungpaya forced the Shan princes to accept vassal dependency on Burma. In 1756, Alaungpaya’s army seized Syriam and in 1757, Pegu, after which the Mons were defeated. During an expedition to Siam, he conquered Tenasserim (1760). Alaungpaya’s activity led to the unification of feudally fragmented Burma and the creation of a strong centralized Burmese state.

M. G. KOZLOVA

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When recounting the rise of Alaungphaya, he describes how Alaungphaya was able to raise Burman men to fight against the Mons.
The news spread [that the Alaungphaya had defeated the Mons in Shwebo], There was no need to offer bounties or to press men.
Sent by King Alaungphaya, the letter was an effusive and gushing appeal for camaraderie and trade with Britain.
Amid the valuable gems and flowery language, King Alaungphaya confirms his permission for a harbour to be built in the city of Pathein to encourage trading co-operation between the two countries.
Alaungphaya's conquest shifted the centre of Burma from Taungoo to Ava, and involved frequent warfare both to expand his domain and to demonstrate his power (Steinberg 1987, pp.