Josef Albers

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Albers, Josef

Albers, Josef (yōˈzĕf älˈbĕrs), 1888–1976, German-American painter, printmaker, designer, and teacher, b. Bottrop, Germany. After working at the Bauhaus (1920–33), Albers and his wife, the textile designer and weaver Anni Albers, emigrated to the United States when Hitler came to power. Albers taught throughout the Americas and Europe, headed the art department (1933–49) and was rector (1941–49) at Black Mountain College, and was director of the Yale School of Art (1950–58), where he was responsible for major innovations in art education. An extremely versatile artist, he is best known for his Homage to the Square, a series of paintings and prints begun in 1949. These serene works, quasiconcentric squares of subtly related colors, form an extensive examination of color properties.

Bibliography

See his Interaction of Color (1963); studies by E. Gomringer (1968) and W. Spies (1971).

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Albers, Josef

(1888–1976) painter; born in Bottrop, Germany. In 1933, fleeing from Nazism, he emigrated to America to continue his teaching career at Black Mountain College, North Carolina (1933–49), and at Yale University (1950–60). A series of paintings, Homage to the Square, reveals his fascination with color relationships. He was influential in introducing the Bauhaus art school concepts from Germany, which stressed craftsmanship and a functional approach to design.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.