Kahn, Albert

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Kahn, Albert

(kän), 1869–1942, American architect, noted as a designer of factories, b. Germany, immigrated to the United States in 1880. He worked as a draftsman in a Detroit architect's office, learning the practice of architecture by observing and doing, and traveled abroad on an architectural scholarship in 1891. In 1895 he opened his own firm, Albert Kahn Associates, in Detroit, applying the techniques of mass production to architecture; a great number of factories, war plants, and naval bases were among the nearly 2,000 buildings he designed worldwide. Much of his finest work is found in the Detroit area: elegant homes in Grosse Pointe; the Belle Isle Aquarium (1904); the Packard Plant (1908), which unlike many of his automobile factories has not been razed; the Hill Auditorium at the Univ. of Michigan (1913); the art-deco-style Fisher Building (1928); and the modernist First National Building. Kahn was a pioneer in the use of reinforced concrete and steel. From 1928 to 1932 he was in charge of the industrial building program in the USSR.

Bibliography

See G. Nelson, Industrial Architecture of Albert Kahn, Inc. (1939), and M. H. Hodges, Building the Modern World (2018).

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Kahn, Albert

(1869–1942)
German-born American architect who formed a practice with his brothers Julius and Moritz; designed industrial buildings for automobile manufacturers Packard, Ford, and Chrysler.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Two exhibitions open Wednesday - "Lebanon 1919," showing historic photos of Beirut from the Albert Kahn collection at the Roman Baths, and "Beirut" by Lebanese photojournalist Nabil Ismail at the Beirut Souks.
* Building the Modern World: Albert Kahn in Detroit by Michael Hodges (Wayne State University Press)
Synopsis: Albert Kahn (March 21, 1869-December 8, 1942) was the foremost American industrial architect of his day.
"All but one of the hotels are located in historic buildings, many of which were designed by great architects of the past," Berke says, name-checking Albert Kahn, McKim, Mead & White, and Shreve, Lamb & Harmon.
Architect Albert Kahn and his landmark campus buildings (e.g., Hill Auditorium built in 1913) marked the expansion of the campus northward beyond the original park/Diag area.
Both buildings were designed by Albert Kahn, often called the architect of Detroit.
Counter-Archive: Film, the Everyday, and Albert Kahn's Archives de la Planete