Terhune, Albert Payson

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Terhune, Albert Payson

(1872–1942) writer; born in Newark, N.J. His mother was Mary Virginia Hawes Terhune ("Marion Harland") (1830–1922), a successful writer of books on household management such as Common Sense in the Household (1871). Albert and his family lived in Europe (1876–78), returned to Springfield, Mass. (1878–84), and settled in Brooklyn, N.Y. His father was a minister, and the family summered at Sunnybank, in Pompton Lakes, N.J., the setting of many books by Terhune. After study at Columbia University (B.A. 1893), he toured Europe and the Near East with his mother, then returned to New York City to work as a reporter for the Evening World (1894–1914). From 1912 on, he lived at Sunnybank. He wrote many magazine stories and is best known for his collie stories for young readers, such as Lad, A Dog (1919).
References in periodicals archive ?
Albert Payson Terhune had Lad, Lee Duncan had Rin Tin Tin, Percy Fitzpatrick had Jock, and I had Vleis.
From the sports world he gives us Jack Dempsey's brutal mauling of Jess Willard and the crooked ballplayers of the Black Sox scandal; and from popular literature, readings of novels by Gene Stratton Porter and Albert Payson Terhune that underscore their racism and xenophobia.
Mary Virginia Hawes Terhune, who wrote stories under the pen name Marion Harland and whose son was <IR> ALBERT PAYSON TERHUNE </IR> , complied a popular volume called Common Sense in the Household (1871).
Born in New Jersey, Van de Water was the son of Virginia Van de Water, author of several books; the grandson of <IR> MARY VIRGINIA TERHUNE </IR> (Marion Harland), novelist and author of books on housekeeping; and the nephew of <IR> ALBERT PAYSON TERHUNE </IR> .