Alboin


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Alboin

Alboin (ălˈboin), d. 572?, first Lombard king in Italy (569–572?). With the Avars he defeated the Gepidae (see Germans). He then led (568) an army across the Alps into Italy, took (569) Milan, and after a three-year siege conquered Pavia, which became his capital. He won most of N and central Italy from the Byzantines (see Lombards). According to a legend probably based on fact, he was murdered at the instigation of his wife, Rosamond.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Their names are even hard to distinguish visually and phonetically: Alboin and Audoin.
Anche questa volta e una Serva a raccontare: Era Alboin prostrato sopra el lecto nel proprio modo come lo lasciasti, ma di piu alto sonno addormentato, ...
Solon trained others and notable among them were Frederick Rhead, who later went to work for Woods and Sons, and Wedgwood, and Alboin and Laurence Birks who produced some stunning pieces.
A pair of Minton pete-sur-pete plaques signed by Solon's assistant Alboin Birks.
Alboin), the ruler of Italy, is also identified as beam Eadwines (the son of Eadwine, 74b).
In other words, the same man whom Paul the Deacon calls Alboin and identifies as the conqueror of Italy is here identified as the son of Eadwine, and therefore the brother of that same princess Ealhhild who has been the speaker's benefactor:
Although the name AElfwine is clearly equivalent to the Latin name Alboin, there is no evidence that the Widsith-poet conceives of AElfwine as a Lombard.
The career of Alboin is recounted in detail, after more than two centuries of legendary accretion, by Paulus Diaconus in his Historia Langobardorum book 1, chs.
(53) Chambers, Widsith, 123-24, concludes of Eadwine and his son AElfwine that "there is no doubt that they are the Audoin and Alboin under whom the Lombard people emerge again into the light of history," particularly in the pages of Paul the Deacon's history.
By assuming the title of king of the Lombards he showed that it was not his object to destroy the nationality of the countrymen of Alboin, nor to force them into one people with the Franks, Had his own son Pippin lived and transmitted his sceptre to his descendants, there ought possibly have been founded a kingdom of italy, strong, patriotic and enduring.
Son of King Audoin; king of the Lombards on his father's death (565); allied with the Avars and attacked the Gepidae, defeating and killing their King Cunimund in battle, and marrying Cunimund's daughter, Rosamund (567); uneasy with his Avar allies, Alboin decided to find safer lands in Italy, and crossed the Julian Alps at the head of all the Lombards and 20,000 Saxons (April 568); defeated Longinus, exarch of Ravenna (June?) and occupied Milan (September 569); besieged Pavia (569-572) and made it his capital when it fell; reputedly murdered by Rosamund, who was incensed that Alboin had made her drink from a cup made of her father's skull (572 or 573).
By 569, the Italian peninsula was again the stage of another invasion, that of the Longobards led by King Alboin. Discussed in chapter three, "The Longobards in War and Peace and the Temporal Dominion of the Popes and of Venice," this invasion appears to have been marked by a wish on the part of the invaders to settle permanently.