albumin

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Related to Albumins: fibrinogen, Globulins

albumin

(ălbyo͞o`mən) [Lat.,=white of egg], member of a class of water-soluble, heat-coagulating proteinsprotein,
any of the group of highly complex organic compounds found in all living cells and comprising the most abundant class of all biological molecules. Protein comprises approximately 50% of cellular dry weight.
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. Albumins are widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, e.g., ovalbumin of egg, myogen of muscle, serum albumin of blood, lactalbumin of milk, legumelin of peas, and leucosin of wheat. Separation of serum albumins from other blood proteins can be carried out by electrophoresis or by fractional precipitation with various salts. Albumins normally constitute about 55% of the plasma proteins. They adhere chemically to various substances in the blood, e.g., amino acids, and thus play a role in their transport. Albumins and other proteins of the blood aid significantly in regulating the distribution of water and maintenance of proper osmotic pressure in the body. Albumins are also used in textile printing, in the fixation of dyes, in sugar refining, and in other important processes.

Albumin

A type of globular protein that is characterized by its solubility in water and in 50% saturated aqueous ammonium sulfate. Albumins are present in mammalian tissues, bacteria, molds, and plants, and in some foods. Serum albumin, which contains 584 amino acid residues, is the most abundant protein in human serum, and it performs two very important physiological functions. It is responsible for about 80% of the total osmotic regulation in blood, and it transports fatty acids from adipose tissue to muscle. When excessive amounts of albumin are found in the urine upon clinical examination, some form of kidney disease is usually indicated. Another important albumin, ovalbumin, is found in egg white. This protein is about two-thirds the size of serum albumin, and it contains sugar residues in addition to amino acid residues (that is, it is a glycoprotein). See Protein

albumin

[‚al′byü·mən]
(biochemistry)
Any of a group of plant and animal proteins which are soluble in water, dilute salt solutions, and 50% saturated ammonium sulfate.

albumin

, albumen
any of a group of simple water-soluble proteins that are coagulated by heat and are found in blood plasma, egg white, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If this point is further proven in prospective randomized clinical trials it means that these patients can easily be managed with a lower dose of albumin without putting them at increased risk of renal failure.
We segregated our patients into two groups based on the amount of albumin given.
Because veterinary medicine is dependent on commercially available chemistry analyzers, use of BCG has also become the predominant methodology for albumin measurement in animal samples.
The purpose of the current study was to examine the validity of albumin measurements in penguin (Spheniscus species) plasma.
Increased urinary excretion of albumin is recognized as an early indicator of glomerular injury in diabetes, before injury is indicated by assays for total urinary protein (1).
Two issues have recently generated questions and controversy about the accuracy of urinary albumin measurements.
Human Serum Albumin (HSA) with a high concentration in circulation has different functions such as drug carrying, and represents antioxidant, esterase and peroxidase activities (13,14).
This brief paper speaks to the need for the early identification of MA as a risk factor in diabetic nephropathy and CVD, then it reviews conventional and new albumin tests.
An appropriate assessment of the reproducibility of albumin depletion data derived from SELDI-TOF MS is important because early studies using this technology were hampered by lack of standardization and reproducibility of protein profiling (20, 21).
It is the pH-dependent interaction between albumin fusion and FcRn that provides the basis for the latest advancements in albumin fusion technology.
In recent years, some studies have been published related to the significance of albumin binding functions.
We have carried out a literature survey of reports accumulated over the 15 years following the first description of the concept of "N-terminal modification" of albumin to investigate the reasons for the limited reproducibility and accuracy of the ACB assay.