albumin

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Related to Albumins: fibrinogen, Globulins

albumin

(ălbyo͞o`mən) [Lat.,=white of egg], member of a class of water-soluble, heat-coagulating proteinsprotein,
any of the group of highly complex organic compounds found in all living cells and comprising the most abundant class of all biological molecules. Protein comprises approximately 50% of cellular dry weight.
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. Albumins are widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, e.g., ovalbumin of egg, myogen of muscle, serum albumin of blood, lactalbumin of milk, legumelin of peas, and leucosin of wheat. Separation of serum albumins from other blood proteins can be carried out by electrophoresis or by fractional precipitation with various salts. Albumins normally constitute about 55% of the plasma proteins. They adhere chemically to various substances in the blood, e.g., amino acids, and thus play a role in their transport. Albumins and other proteins of the blood aid significantly in regulating the distribution of water and maintenance of proper osmotic pressure in the body. Albumins are also used in textile printing, in the fixation of dyes, in sugar refining, and in other important processes.

Albumin

A type of globular protein that is characterized by its solubility in water and in 50% saturated aqueous ammonium sulfate. Albumins are present in mammalian tissues, bacteria, molds, and plants, and in some foods. Serum albumin, which contains 584 amino acid residues, is the most abundant protein in human serum, and it performs two very important physiological functions. It is responsible for about 80% of the total osmotic regulation in blood, and it transports fatty acids from adipose tissue to muscle. When excessive amounts of albumin are found in the urine upon clinical examination, some form of kidney disease is usually indicated. Another important albumin, ovalbumin, is found in egg white. This protein is about two-thirds the size of serum albumin, and it contains sugar residues in addition to amino acid residues (that is, it is a glycoprotein). See Protein

albumin

[‚al′byü·mən]
(biochemistry)
Any of a group of plant and animal proteins which are soluble in water, dilute salt solutions, and 50% saturated ammonium sulfate.

albumin

, albumen
any of a group of simple water-soluble proteins that are coagulated by heat and are found in blood plasma, egg white, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amongst all of them albumin has been the most widely agent used so far and is found to be highly effective in preventing PICD following LVP.
In prior studies, albumin has been administered at a dose of 6- 8gm/litre of ascitic fluid removed.
It is the pH-dependent interaction between albumin fusion and FcRn that provides the basis for the latest advancements in albumin fusion technology.
Further research has identified potential amino acids involved in the binding of albumin to FcRn through the analysis of polymorphisms, cross species binding studies and sequence alignments.
Albumin is the most abundant protein in normal plasma and is integral to the maintenance of physiological balance.
The Immulite assay, which uses a mouse monoclonal antibody, strongly cross-reacted with albumin from baboon and rabbit, but did not cross-react with albumins from other species.
Chicken IgY antibodies may be superior to other immunoaffinity-based albumin depletion methods because of their high affinity and specificity for albumin from multiple mammalian species (19), so we used them in this experiment.
These nonalbumin proteins were resolved from the albumins.
A double albumin band was also detected in one of the patient's three daughters, with no other electrophoretic abnormalities, supporting the inherited (genetic) form of bisalbuminemia (Fig.
The theoretical average isotopic mass of disulfidelinked albumin A is 66 438 Da.
The most commonly used serum albumin assays in clinical laboratories rely on dye-binding techniques (8).
The application of albumin in surgery and shock trauma consumes ~100 000 kg of this protein per year in North America alone, leading to large-scale commercial purification as well as recombinant production.