Alcaligenes

(redirected from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans)
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Alcaligenes

[‚al·kə′lij·ə‚nēz]
(microbiology)
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic rods and cocci of uncertain affiliation; cells are motile, and species are commonly found in the intestinal tract of vertebrates.
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Foster City, CA) has patented a method and a composition for treatment of pulmonary bacterial infections caused by gram-negative bacteria suitable for treatment of infection caused by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacter species, Serratia marcescens as well as those caused by Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, and multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, using a concentrated formulation of aztreonam lysinate delivered as an aerosol or dry powder formulation.
In 2002, we investigated a cluster of patients with Alcaligenes xylosoxidans bloodstream infections by conducting a matched case--control study and a prospective study.
Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, also known as Achromobacter xylosoxidans, is a gram-negative, water-borne organism that causes healthcare-associated infections (1-7) and bacteremia in immunocompromised patients with indwelling catheters (6-11); it can also contaminate liquids (2,5,12-14).
Kayssi, "Delivery of Benzene to Alcaligenes Xylosoxidans by Solid Polymers in a Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor," Biotechnol.
The most tow successful strains able to degrade both phenol and PHA were characterized by stander criteria as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp.
The multidrug-resistant pathogen was Acinetobacter baumannii in 55% of cases, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 37%, Klebsiella pneumoniae in 5%, and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans in 3%.
Two isolates, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were found at all twelve locations and in a very high percentage of the samples collected (72% and 92% of the 36 samples respectively).
The dramatic improvement in the survival of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been complicated by the development of highly resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus; the appearance of new virulent pathogens, such as Burkholderia cepacia; and the emergence of organisms of undetermined clinical importance, such as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and the nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) (1-4).