Alaska Highway

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Alaska Highway,

all-weather road, 1,523 mi (2,451 km) long, extending NW from Dawson Creek, British Columbia, to Fairbanks, Alaska. An extension of an existing Canadian road between Dawson Creek and Edmonton, Alta., the Alaska Highway was constructed (Mar.–Sept., 1942) by U.S. troops as a supply route to military forces in Alaska during World War II. It was a significant engineering feat because of the difficulties of terrain and weather. In the last stretch to Fairbanks the road used the previously built Richardson Highway. The Haines Cutoff connects the Alaska Highway with the Alaska panhandle. In 1946 control of the Canadian part of the road was transferred to Canada. In 1947 the entire highway was opened to unrestricted travel; it is one of the best routes to Alaska. The highway is open throughout the year, and there are roadside facilities along its length. It was formerly known as the Alaskan International Highway and the Alcan Highway.
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Alaska Highway

a road extending from Dawson Creek, British Columbia, to Fairbanks, Alaska: built by the US Army (1942). Length: 2452 km (1523 miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Alcan Highway, for better or worse, has altered the lives of those who live in the region.
Even though the Japanese were successfully routed from the Aleutian Islands, the Alcan Highway was effectively used to transport thousands of airplanes to Russia via Nome and Fairbanks during World War II.
Driving the ALCAN highway can be a rewarding and exciting experience as well as a great way to see North America.
Though they haven't made a definitive statement on a preferred route, and are publicly neutral on the issue, Curtis Thayer, the spokesman for BP, ExxonMobil and Phillips, notes that the Northern Route is cheaper, and has a smaller environmental footprint than the so-called Alcan Highway route which crosses Alaska and Canada.
Old-timers still call it the Alcan Highway, but the road officially is known as the Alaska Highway.
The Big Road (1946) describes the building of the Alcan highway to Alaska.
Lynden Transport has been moving LTL freight to Alaska for more than 50 years, including one of the most memorable LTL loads to travel the Alcan Highway: a side of fresh beef trucked from Seattle to Carr's Market in Fairbanks in 1954.
Tony Knowles supports Foothill's Phase II Alcan highway route.
29 Juneteenth Alaska Alcan Highway Jazz and Arts Festival
"Fewer people drove up the Alcan Highway, and more people flew into Whitehorse or Anchorage," she says.
specially built Kenworth tractor/trailers made the trip up the Alcan Highway to Alaska from the Lower 48.