Alcestis


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Alcestis

(ălsĕs`tĭs), in Greek mythology, daughter of PeliasPelias
, in Greek mythology, usurper of the throne of Iolcus. He was the son of Tyro and Poseidon and the twin brother of Neleus. After his birth his mother married Cretheus, king of Iolcus, and gave birth to Aeson.
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. She was won in marriage by Admetus, who fulfilled her father's condition that her suitor come for her in a chariot pulled by a wild boar and a lion. So great was her devotion that when Admetus was granted life by the gods if someone would die in his place, she willingly gave her life. In some myths Hercules rescued her from the dead; in others Persephone was so touched that she reunited husband and wife. The legend was dramatized by Euripides in his play Alcestis, which became the basis for operas by Gluck, Handel, and others, and by Thornton Wilder in his play A Life in the Sun.

Alcestis

after dying in place of her husband, she is brought back from the dead by Heracles. [Gk. Drama: Alcestis]

Alcestis

offered self up to die in the stead of Admetus. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 11]
References in periodicals archive ?
(1974) "Alcestis and the rhetoric of departure", QJS 60: 296-305.
In the end, no one volunteers to die on his behalf except for his young wife Alcestis, who bids farewell to life and embarks on a journey to the Underworld.
En la segunda linea de interpretacion, para resolver la pregunta anterior, la autora analiza cuatro de las obras de Euripides: Alcestis, Hipolito, Ion, Orestes e Ifigenia.
El Ciclope, Alcestis, Medea, Los Heraclidas Hipolito, Andromaca, Hecuba.
SOPHOMORE CLASS First Session Second Session Satires of Horace; Alcestis of Cicero de Officiis; de Amicitia; de Euripides; Trigonometry; Senectute; Homer's Iliad; Euripides; Mensuration, Surveying Linear Perspective And Navigation; Latin and and Analytical Geometry; Latin and Greek Exercises; Greek Greek Exercises; Greek Testament, continued.
Alcestis are interpreted mainly through the myth's basic ideas--ideal
(8) Carlo Maria Maggi, whose tragedy Griselda di Saluzzo served as a model for the majority of theatrical Griseldas in the eighteenth century (Smarr 205), (9) names Griselda's "Heroica tolerantia" (III, 414) and likens her to Alcestis (from Euripidean tragedy) and Dido (from Virgilian epic); his Griselda is unequivocally a human martyr figure, and not a divine one.
Blanchard's Antigone Travestie (1845), Robert Brough's Medea; or, the Best of Mothers, with a Brute of a Husband (1856) and Francis Talfourd's Alcestis, the Original Strong-Minded Woman (1850) and Electra in a New Electric Light (1859), evinces the difficulties which often arise for an anthologist, whose task involves not simply selecting texts, but also complex textual archaeology and the making of annotations and other paratextual documents to the works anthologised.
Indeed, Chapter 2 follows quite closely the itinerary along which the figure of Clizia turns from a carnally loved woman with human traits, in the first phase of Occasioni (1933-1937), to a visiting angel who starts assuming magic and goddesslike connotations in the second poetic phase (1938 1940), and finally is transformed into a Christ-like figure who chooses to sacrifice her love and life not only to save her lover (as Alcestis offered to do for her husband Admetus), but also to redeem all of humanity.
To start with, the author gives the example of Alcestis, which it is argued, is a confrontation within a democracy of the privileges of aristocracy.
(30) Ver a Esquilo, Agamenon, 1022, 199; Euripides, Alcestis 3-4, 13.