auk

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auk

(ôk), common name for a member of the family Alcidae (alcid family), swimming and diving birds of the N Atlantic and Pacific, which includes the guillemots and puffins. Their legs are set far back on their bodies, making them clumsy on land, where they seldom venture except to nest. The extinct, flightless great auk, Pinguinus impennis, or garefowl, represents the largest species. It was about the size of a goose, black above and grayish white below, and was formerly abundant in the N Atlantic. Slaughtered in its breeding grounds for its flesh, feathers, and oil, it became extinct c.1844. The least auklet (about 6 1-2 in./16.3 cm), common in the Bering Sea region, is the smallest of the family, and the razor-billed auk, Alca torda (16–18 in./40–45 cm), is the largest surviving member. The Eskimos hunt the dovekie (Plautus alle), or little auk, for food and use its feathered skin for clothing. Auks return to the same breeding grounds every year, and each individual goes to the very same nesting site. The single egg is laid on bare rock on cliff ledges, and incubation duties are shared by both parents. Auks are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Charadriiformes, family Alcidae.

auk

[ȯk]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of several large, short-necked diving birds (Alca) of the family Alcidae found along North Atlantic coasts.

auk

1. any of various diving birds of the family Alcidae of northern oceans having a heavy body, short tail, narrow wings, and a black-and-white plumage: order Charadriiformes
2. little auk a small short-billed auk, Plautus alle, abundant in Arctic regions
References in periodicals archive ?
Alcid noted that these are all suggested themes and they do not limit the scope of the documentary showcase.
In penguins and other alcids, adult individuals with leucism or other colour aberrations were reported as regular breeders (Sealy, 1969; Voisin et al.
Those observations suggest that factors causing late-hatched alcid chicks to grow slowly might be largely responsible for causing them to depart lower in mass as well.
Alcid said they are negotiating for a majority stake in a start-up company that will be engaged in the recovery of gasoline, diesel, and kerosene from plastic waste products and expects to complete the transaction in one to two months.
Due to the bird's small size, short neck, stubby bill, and unique plumage (specifically, a black throat extending to the upper breast and a distinctive white line on two-thirds of the upper eye-ring), it was immediately separated from other alcid species (Fig.
The possible amendment, however, does not diminish the historical significance of the mansion,' Alcid said.
In a press briefing on Tuesday, Philrealty president and chief executive officer Andrew Alcid said while property would still be the company's bread and butter moving forward, the entry into these four new businesses would unlock new sources of recurring revenues seen to keep the company afloat if and when the real estate downturn happens.
In our case, you will actually see what you are buying the moment you make your purchase," said Andrew Alcid of Philrealty.
Alcid patchiness and flight direction near a colony in eastern Newfoundland.
Tomas de Aquino and Colegio de Manila all in Manila, said Alvin Alcid, chief of the NHCP research, publication and heraldry division.
Natal philopatry and nest-site fidelity are common among several avian taxa (Hepp and others 1989; Part and Doligez 2003), especially many alcid species that exploit limited nesting habitat (Ainley and others 2002; Butler and Buckley 2002).