alcohol dehydrogenase

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Related to Alcohol metabolism: alcohol dehydrogenase

alcohol dehydrogenase

[′al·kə‚hȯl ‚dē·hī′drä·jə‚nās]
(biochemistry)
The enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results suggest that FGF21 has a dual role in alcohol metabolism.
Ramchandani, "Genetic and environmental influences on alcohol metabolism in humans," Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol.
When social events and gatherings call for the consumption of adult beverages, a single DEFY[R] mix before, during or after social activities can enhance alcohol metabolism and help next-day mental alertness.
Newer research shows that byproducts of alcohol metabolism, including the breakdown product acetaldehyde, can actually cause cancer as well as suppress the body's immune defenses against cancer.
Many Japanese have a unique alcohol metabolism compared to the Caucasian population.
Acetaldehyde, the end product of alcohol metabolism, can prevent activation of vitamins.
It should be remembered that the pattern of alcohol drinking, at least in North American tribes, is unequal among different groups; (28) however, the presence of alcohol problem drinking in indigenous groups, as in other ethnic groups, is related to multiple factors, for indigenous may be precipitating stressors such as migration, experiences of discrimination, or economic disadvantages and even genetic variations in alcohol metabolism.
Alcohol metabolism occurs in the liver by enzymatic action of alcohol dehydrogenase (Shepard, Tuma, & Tuma, 2010) at approximately one drink (7 g) of alcohol per hour.
In alcohol metabolism and detoxifying metabolism liver plays the major role, liver is sensitized by induction of Cytochrome P 450 especially Cytochrome P II E for catabolism of alcohol in the process of detoxification and the metabolism of Cytochrome P 450 ROS is produced more, which are responsible for the damage of cellular proteins and membrane.
Alcohol dehydrogenases that perform most of the alcohol metabolism are homodimeric enzymes, which contain [alpha], [beta], and y subunits, being encoded by ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3 respectively.
These data suggest that PR-mediated ethanol metabolism was associated with enhanced ADH and ALDH activities, extrapolating that PR treatment expedited alcohol metabolism, promoted the bioavailability of alcohol, and rescued hepatocytes from alcohol-induced damage.
Researchers have reduced blood alcohol levels in intoxicated mice by injecting them with nanocapsules containing enzymes that are instrumental in alcohol metabolism.