defect

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defect

Crystallog a local deviation from regularity in the crystal lattice of a solid

Defect

In lumber, an irregularity occurring in or on wood that will tend to impair its strength, durability, or utility value.

defect

[′dē‚fekt]
(science and technology)
An irregularity that spoils the appearance or impairs the usefulness or effectiveness of an object or a material by causing weakness or failure.

defect

In wood, a fault that may reduce its durability, usefulness, or strength.

defect

References in periodicals archive ?
Humphrey, "Preventing Alcohol-Related Birth Defects," UPI, 12 December 1982, LNOS.
An important strategy for preventing alcohol-related birth defects is the development of better screening techniques to identify women at high risk for heavy alcohol consumption throughout their pregnancy.
Conversely, if a woman, even an alcoholic one, stops drinking before becoming pregnant, her fetus will not develop FAS or any alcohol-related birth defects.
Tom Frederick, co-owner of the bar said that sparing even one unborn child from alcohol-related birth defects or developmental disabilities makes the effort worthwhile.
Increased vulnerability to alcohol-related birth defects in the offspring of mothers over 30.
Washington, August 23 ( ANI ): In a new study, researchers have tried to shed light on alcohol-related birth defects.
Moreover, children of mothers with this allele are less vulnerable to alcohol-related birth defects.
KEY WORDS: Ethanol metabolism; ethanol clearance; pregnancy; maternal alcohol exposure; fetal alcohol effects; fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD); alcohol-related birth defects (ARBD); nutrition; total enteral nutrition (TEN); maternal nutrition; genetic factors
A woman drinking alcohol at any time during her pregnancy, even during the earliest weeks, increases the risk of her fetus developing alcohol-related birth defects (see the textbox) (Office of the Surgeon General 2005).
Similarly, in the study of pregnant, inner-city African American women, only the lighter drinkers who were less at risk of having children with alcohol-related birth defects heeded warning labels (Hankin et al.

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