alcoholic

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alcoholic

a person affected by alcoholism
www.ias.org.uk
www.alcoholconcern.org.uk

alcoholic

[‚al·kə′hȯl·ik]
(medicine)
An individual who consumes excess amounts of alcoholic beverages to the extent of being addicted, habituated, or dependent.
References in periodicals archive ?
The model and reality TV star, son of legendary footballer George Best, is joining politicians including Birmingham MP Liam Byrne to demand support for children affected by having an alcoholic parent.
Crucially, children of alcoholics are four times more likely to become alcoholics themselves
Drinking is often a symptom of underlying psychological and/or developmental problems; once alcoholics stop trying to "control" their drinking, they can begin to address these underlying issues.
The clinical survey of alcoholic liver disease was carried out and total one hundred patients with diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease are included in study.
The principle is reflected in the stated purpose of AA, which is to help individuals "stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety."
We believe the assistance our organisation can offer individuals affected by others' drinking may also help ease the pressure on doctors and medical organisations who often have to deal with the family distress of the alcoholic home in the different ways that this can be presented by an individual attending the surgery or health centre.
I have also known alcoholics who go into re-hab for a holiday at the tax payers' expense, with no intention of ever changing their lifestyle.
HFAs are challenging to treat compared with lower-functioning alcoholics. Their ability to maintain their personal and professional lives often makes it difficult to have "leverage" in assisting them to change their drinking habits or to abstain.
The investigators also looked at the impact of marriage on drug use trajectories in young adult children of alcoholics and determined that "marriage mediated but did not moderate the relations between parental alcoholism and the rate of change in drug use during the transition into young adulthood and the level of drug use at ages 25 to 30."
This finding is important for this paper since we studied women managers and people's attitudes toward those who are alcoholics. These attitudes can affect the entire social climate and will affect not only group performance but perhaps the future drinking behavior of the manager.