Alcoholics Anonymous


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Related to Alcoholics Anonymous: alcoholism, Narcotics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous

(AA), worldwide organization dedicated to the treatment of alcoholics; founded 1935 by two alcoholics, one a New York broker, the other an Ohio physician. They developed a 12-step program that has made coping with alcoholism possible for countless people. It includes psychological principles that have long been used in the reorganization of personality. The organization functions through local groups that have no constitutions, officers, or dues. Anyone with a drinking problem may become a member. There are presently over 99,000 local groups in the United States; worldwide membership is approximately 2 million. Other groups patterned on AA include Narcotics Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, and Gamblers Anonymous.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

society of ex-alcoholics who help alcoholics to stop drinking. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 356]

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

organization founded to help alcoholics (1934). [Am. Culture: EB, I: 448]
References in periodicals archive ?
Not-God: A history of Alcoholics Anonymous. New York: Hazelden.
Humphreys and colleagues (1991) reported that women would be more likely to affiliate with AA than men despite a recent Alcoholics Anonymous membership survey that found that 67% of AA members are male (Alcoholics Anonymous, 2008).
Meta-analysis of the literature on Alcoholics Anonymous: sample and study characteristics moderate findings.
Alcoholics Anonymous meetings will begin every hour through 1:30 p.m.
In his Twelve Traditions, Wilson set down the suggested bylaws of Alcoholics Anonymous and thereby created a blueprint for an organisation that wanted a maximum of individual freedom, and no link to power or money.
Most have never heard of it, or think it's Alcoholics Anonymous. But some take a referral to Al-Anon.
Their theories go against the teaching of Alcoholics Anonymous, and of many alcoholism treatment centres, but the couple feel that the traditional approaches to treating alcoholism are inadequate and outdated.
must also attend Alcoholics Anonymous and complete the annual relapse prevention program provided by the Sexual Behaviour Program, while both adults are to maintain regular contact with the Healthy Babies, Healthy Children Program and to complete other parenting programs consistent with the girls' development.
STORYTELLING IN ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS: A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS.
"Not really an AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) group, but a circle, just to talk," he says.
It takes an often-overlooked approach of transforming the twelve-step recovery program of Alcoholics Anonymous to a similar Depression Anonymous program, in order to help people cope and remain balanced.