alder

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alder

(ôl`dər), name for deciduous trees and shrubs of the genus Alnus of the family Betulaceae (birchbirch,
common name for some members of the Betulaceae, a family of deciduous trees or shrubs bearing male and female flowers on separate plants, widely distributed in the Northern Hemisphere. They are valued for their hardwood lumber and edible fruits and as ornamental trees.
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 family), widely distributed, especially in mountainous and moist areas of the north temperate zone and in the Andes. The black alder (A. glutinosa) is an Old World species now naturalized in E North America. Its bark, still used for dyes and tanning, was formerly considered medicinal; its wood is useful chiefly as charcoal. A. rugosa, the speckled alder, forms extensive swamp thickets in Eurasia and North America. The red alder (A. rubra), the largest tree of the genus, is the most important hardwood timber tree in its native region, the Pacific coast of North America. Alder trees are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Fagales, family Betulaceae.

alder

[′ȯl·dər]
(botany)
The common name for several trees of the genus Alnus.

alder

A moderately light-colored, light-weight hardwood that changes to flesh color or light brown when dried; often stained to simulate cherry, mahogany or walnut; often used as plywood core and crossbanding.

alder

1. any N temperate betulaceous shrub or tree of the genus Alnus, having toothed leaves and conelike fruits. The bark is used in dyeing and tanning and the wood for bridges, etc. because it resists underwater rot
2. any of several similar trees or shrubs
References in periodicals archive ?
Fast growing red alder grows principally in the Pacific Northwest, but its appeal goes far beyond its native region, with sales booming around the world, particularly in China.
in Kent, WA, has been in the red alder business for more than 30 years.
Fifty years ago, red alder was primarily used as material for making pallets, firewood or for smoking fish," said Hasegawa.
The supply has always been there, in great plenitude, because red alder (Alnus rubra to be technical about it) is a tree that moves speedily to establish itself in river bottoms and lowland areas once the dominant conifers are gone.
Dave Sweitzer, secretary-manager of the Northwest Hardwoods Association, describes alder as "a come-along species.
Another reason is the fact that we have concentrated solely on recruiting the best consultants", says Mats Alders.
Other domestic alders include the California alder, Alnus rhombifolia, also called white or western alder and Arizona alder, Alnus oblongifolia.
Red alder is a water-loving, quick-growing tree that thrives in moist conditions.
At one time, alder was considered a "weed" tree, a nuisance that was bulldozed to leave room for the more highly-regarded Douglas firs, hemlock, and other conifers.
the aggressive marketing program here and abroad has made alder the third most extensively exported: hardwood in the United States.
Terry Windle, Alder Hey's planning director, said: "We are committed to refurbishing the park and I would not rule out bidding for lottery grants.
Alder Hey has now successfully brought down the proposed cost of the new hospital to pounds 250m, from an original estimate of pounds 350m.