alder

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alder

(ôl`dər), name for deciduous trees and shrubs of the genus Alnus of the family Betulaceae (birchbirch,
common name for some members of the Betulaceae, a family of deciduous trees or shrubs bearing male and female flowers on separate plants, widely distributed in the Northern Hemisphere. They are valued for their hardwood lumber and edible fruits and as ornamental trees.
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 family), widely distributed, especially in mountainous and moist areas of the north temperate zone and in the Andes. The black alder (A. glutinosa) is an Old World species now naturalized in E North America. Its bark, still used for dyes and tanning, was formerly considered medicinal; its wood is useful chiefly as charcoal. A. rugosa, the speckled alder, forms extensive swamp thickets in Eurasia and North America. The red alder (A. rubra), the largest tree of the genus, is the most important hardwood timber tree in its native region, the Pacific coast of North America. Alder trees are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Fagales, family Betulaceae.

alder

[′ȯl·dər]
(botany)
The common name for several trees of the genus Alnus.

alder

A moderately light-colored, light-weight hardwood that changes to flesh color or light brown when dried; often stained to simulate cherry, mahogany or walnut; often used as plywood core and crossbanding.

alder

1. any N temperate betulaceous shrub or tree of the genus Alnus, having toothed leaves and conelike fruits. The bark is used in dyeing and tanning and the wood for bridges, etc. because it resists underwater rot
2. any of several similar trees or shrubs
References in periodicals archive ?
"The Japanese and others had no negative perceptions of red alder. It wasn't a weed tree to them, but a very versatile wood with great potential.
Birt Beltzer, product manager at Acorn Custom Cabinetry, New Castle, WA, said red alder's popularity has slowed down with clients after a record high two years ago, but he still gets calls for the wood.
The same name as is used for alder refers in Finnic dialects also to the blood of a killed animal, as well as to the blood or liquid mixed with blood issuing from a living body (e.g.
There is hardly any doubt that in the above cases of lepp(a) denoting both blood and alder, one and the same word is used.
Dunwoody put his arm around Miss Alders' neck and told her not to scream, shout or try to get away or he would cut her throat.
Then, in a dramatic gesture, the defendant put the blade of the knife to his own stomach and told Miss Alders to kill him, the court was told.
The supply has always been there, in great plenitude, because red alder (Alnus rubra to be technical about it) is a tree that moves speedily to establish itself in river bottoms and lowland areas once the dominant conifers are gone.
One reason for alder's fecundity is nature's perverse insistence on assuring the proliferation of its leastwanted species, as can be attested to by any homeowner struggling to enjoy a weed-free lawn next door to a vacant lot choked with dandelions.
RED ALDER'S range is the West Coast of the United States from California north to Alaska and Canada.
Since the mid 1900s, red alder has been gaming in popularity among woodworkers.
Terry Windle, Alder Hey's planning director, said: "We are committed to refurbishing the park and I would not rule out bidding for lottery grants.
According to David Sweitzer, secretary/manager of the Western Hardwood Assn., the aggressive marketing program here and abroad has made alder the third most extensively exported: hardwood in the United States.