Aleksandr Nikolaevich Volkov

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Volkov, Aleksandr Nikolaevich

 

Born Aug. 19 (31), 1886, in Fergana; died Dec. 17, 1957, in Tashkent. Soviet painter. People’s Artist of the Uzbek SSR (1946).

Volkov studied in St. Petersburg, first in the workshop of V. E. Makovskii (1908-10) and then with N. K. Rerikh and I. la. Bilibin (1910-12), and at the Kiev Art School (1912-16) with F. G. Krichevskii. Upon graduating in Kiev, he moved to Tashkent. Volkov’s early works, created under the influence of cubism, are characterized by a stylization and geometrization of forms as well as by saturated color, rich in shadings—for example The Pomegranate Chaikhana (1924; Tret’iakov Gallery). His works dating from the late 1920’s and from the 1930’s are marked by decorative colorfulness, close-ups of faces, and typical national characters—for example, Girls With Cotton (1932; Tret’iakov Gallery) and Kolkhoznik (1933; Art Museum of the Peoples of the East, Moscow). Subsequently overcoming stylization more and more, Volkov attempted to reveal human character, as in his numerous self-portraits and other works. He taught at the Tashkent Art School from 1929 to 1946.

REFERENCE

Rakitin, V. “Khudozhestvennye iskaniia Aleksandra Volkova.” Iskusstvo, 1967, no. 7.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Full browser ?