Solzhenitsyn

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Related to Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn: Vladimir Nabokov, gulag, Boris Pasternak, Mikhail Bulgakov

Solzhenitsyn

Alexander Isayevich . born 1918, Russian novelist. His books include One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (1962), The First Circle (1968), Cancer Ward (1968), August 1914 (1971), The Gulag Archipelago (1974), and October 1916 (1985). His works criticize the Soviet regime and he was imprisoned (1945--53) and exiled to Siberia (1953--56). He was deported to the West from the Soviet Union in 1974; all charges against him were dropped in 1991 and he returned to Russia in 1994. Nobel prize for literature 1970
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With this he joined the ranks of such noticeable figures as Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Mother Teresa, and Billy Graham.
Few are capable of being Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn in the gulag, or the world-class chef who kept children entertained with stories and descriptions of meals in a concentration camp.
First published in 1980, this volume reproduces three major addresses by famed Russian dissident and writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (1918-2008) that were delivered in the United States in the mid-1970s.
The death of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn earlier this year reminds us of the powerful impact of his One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich.
To mark the August death of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, one of the greatest of Russia's writers and a leading Soviet dissident, American Diplomacy seeks to honor his life by reconsidering the June 8, 1978, observations he offered to graduates of Harvard University.
In 1945 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn was sentenced to eight years' imprisonment for making a slighting remark about Stalin in a letter.
The son of Russian author Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn confirmed on Monday (4 August) that the writer died of heart failure on Sunday (3 August) at the age of 89.
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and the Modern Russo-Jewish Question, by Nathan D.
And so you have prima facie reason to be suspicious of my title, "The Enduring Achievement of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.
RUSSIAN AUTHOR AND HISTORIAN ALEKSANDR Solzhenitsyn wrote that the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being," and in Ryan Fleck and Anna Boden's film Half Nelson (ThinkFilm, 2006), Dan Dunne (Ryan Gosling) is a teacher with a deeply divided heart.
These and other actions were a cause of outrage to liberals, while conservatives remember Ford for his absurd attempt to "whip inflation" by mere exhortation, and for his cowardly decision to refuse to receive the exiled Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn in the White House.
Given the current state of Canada's domestic security and international military defence capabilities, a quote attributed to Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn should give us pause: "Make yourself into a lamb, and someone will make himself into a wolf.