Aleutian low


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Aleutian low

[ə′lü·shən ‚lō]
(meteorology)
The low-pressure center located near the Aleutian Islands on mean charts of sea-level pressure; represents one of the main centers of action in the atmospheric circulation of the Northern Hemisphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clark specifically cited the Aleutian Low and Icelandic Low as the major weather systems that could get affected by solar storms.
"Hypothetically a strong expanded thermosphere during a solar event could intensify the larger scale circulations on the plant, the Aleutian Low, and Icelandic Low, but don't take my word for it, the evidence is still out," he told (https://local21news.com/news/videos/how-space-weather-affects-weather-on-earth) 21 News.
The low pressure system in the Gulf of Alaska known as the Aleutian low is an important driver of wintertime precipitation in the North Pacific Ocean region, particularly in Alaska.
They found that the increase closely correlated with warmer sea surface temperatures in the western tropical Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean, which they theorize has triggered a strengthening of the Aleutian low and its northward flow of warm, moist air, leading to much of the surge in snowfall.
Nevertheless, the Aleutian low pressure is more intense and displaced eastward compared to R2.
The extremely late-opening seasons are characterized by an anomalously strong Aleutian low in the preceding November.
Storms are high drama at In fall, the Wickaninnish Inn this luxe 9-year-old inn Aleutian Low draws Osprey Lane; www.wick on a remote edge of potent storms across inn.com or 800/333- Vancouver Island.
"Changes in the character of the Aleutian Low is a common factor for many of the oceanic changes we see," said Dr.
The predominant coverage of fur seal ecology is in examining the influence of climatic regime shifts (e.g., the Aleutian Low and El Nino-Southern Oscillations) and width of the continental shelf around breeding islands on breeding success and population trends.
A deepening of the Aleutian low in 1976/77 (Trenberth and Hurrell 1994; Hare and Mantua 2000) promoted enhanced southerly flow over Alaska, which has been shown to contribute to earlier snowmelt at BRW (Stone et al.
Positive values are associated with a stronger Aleutian Low, which advects more relatively warmer air into Alaska (particularly in winter, when this semipermanent feature is the strongest).
Winter weather is harsh and highly influenced by the position and strength of the Aleutian Low and the Arctic High atmospheric pressure systems (Niebauer, 1983; Overland et al., 1999; Rodionov et al., 2005).