Alexander of Aphrodisias


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Alexander of Aphrodisias

(ăfrōdĭsh`ēəs), fl. A.D. 200, Greek Peripatetic philosopher. A celebrated ancient commentator on Aristotle, he was often called the Exegete. Among his extant writings are portions of commentaries on several of Aristotle's works, including the Metaphysics, as well as some original treatises. These latter include On the Soul, in which Alexander examines the nature of human intellect, and On Fate, a refutation of the Stoic doctrine of determinism. Some of the works attributed to Alexander are thought to be spurious.
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Chapter 5 concludes the volume with a brief consideration of Plutarch, and a much longer consideration of Alexander of Aphrodisias, including a full translation with discussion of his "The Views of the Aristotelians about the Primary Objects of Attachment" (an essay taken from the Mantissa).
Paul, and Alexander of Aphrodisias through those of Isaac Barrow, Sir Isaac Newton, Bernard Mandeville, George Berkeley, Adam Smith, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.
Among the topics are Aristotle and the Hellenistic peripatos from Theophrastus to Critolaus, Aristolianism in the second century AD before Alexander of Aphrodisias, the ancient biographical tradition on Aristotle, Ammonius and the Alexandrian school, Simplicius and Philoponus on the authority of Aristotle, and early Christian philosophers on Aristotle.
Also, this can be documented through the work of Alexander of Aphrodisias (de Fato) seen through the counterfactual that if this were not so, it would destroy the unity of the cosmos (p.
Alexander of Aphrodisias, whose reading of Aristotle's De Anima was so influential in the East and the West.
Alexander of Aphrodisias and his Doctrine of the Soul; 1400 years of lasting significance.
Instead, like Alexander of Aphrodisias before him, Ibn Sina adopts the simplified version of the theory, positing only nine spheres, while at the same time appropriating the remaining Aristotelian views: that the so-called Prime Mover, being both the efficient and final cause in the sense of an object of both love and thought (to orekton kai to noeton), (47) produces motion while all other things move by being moved, and that the first moving sphere, which embraces all the orbs involved in the daily motion, seeks to become as much like the Prime Mover as possible and thus wishes to come to rest in imitation of the First Unmoved Mover.
Abstract: Even though the works of Alexander of Aphrodisias exerted a considerable influence in later Ancient Philosophy and have occupied a prominent place in the history of the Peripatetic school and of ancient Aristotelianism in general, little is know about his teachers and pupils and about his interaction with contemporary philosophers.
Through an analysis of the Heidelberger Disputation from 1518 the author tries to show, that the position of Luther--that the immortality of the soul can not be shown by means of Aristotelian natural philosophy but only through principles of faith--gets some support by the position of Alexander of Aphrodisias, who maintains that in accordance with Aristotelian natural philosophy, the human soul has to be thought of as mortal.
Both Paduan and Ferrarese schools (represented by works such as, respectively, Pietro Pomponazzi's De immortalitate animae and Alberto Lollio's Concio de animae immortalitate) read Aristotle in the light of works by Alexander of Aphrodisias, thus linking the intellective faculties of the human soul to the continuing presence of sense-data; such a view undermined the immortality of the soul as conceived by Christianity and was associated with heresy.
280-206 BCE), who is the primary object of her study, and, in a final chapter, the unnamed Stoic who is the target of criticism in the De Fato of Alexander of Aphrodisias (fl.
Todd, Alexander of Aphrodisias on Stoic Physics: A Study of the De mixtione [Leiden: Brill, 1976]).