Alexander of Pherae


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Alexander of Pherae

(fēr`ē), d. 358 B.C., tyrant of the city of Pherae in Thessaly after 369 B.C. He was opposed by other Thessalian cities and by the Thebans. PelopidasPelopidas
, d. 364 B.C., Theban general. When the Spartans seized the citadel of Thebes (now Thívai) in 382, he fled to Athens and prepared the coup that recovered the city (379).
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 failed (368 B.C.) in one expedition against him and was briefly imprisoned. Returning in 364 B.C., Pelopidas destroyed Alexander's power in the battle of Cynoscephalae, though he himself was killed. Alexander was murdered by members of his own family.
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The anecdote recounts an instance in which Theodorus played a tragic heroine so well that he caused the notoriously cruel tyrant Alexander of Pherae, who was watching the play, to leave the theater in tears.
The twist, of course, is that Alexander of Pherae does not feel this grief for very long, not because he has a noble, Guardian-like soul, but because he is cruel.
The version of the Alexander of Pherae anecdote in the Moralia names the role of either Hecuba or Polyxena in Euripides' Hecuba and does not name the actor, while Plutarch elsewhere mentions Hecuba or Andromache.
The first Alessandro may be Alexander the Great (died 323 BCE), or Alexander of Pherae (killed around 359 BCE), who dressed men up in animal skins and set dogs on them, an unconscious parody of Pasiphae becoming a false cow to mate with the bull.
24) The impulse towards anger and hatred is inextricable from the impulse towards a separate identity, however monstrous, but equally strongly, there is the impulse towards the break-up of that identity and its loss, which in the case of Alexander of Pherae may be hinted at in his game of dressing people in animal skins.
191-95), while discussing how ineffectual it is to rule by fear, refers to a sequence of tyrants: Julius Caesar, the elder Dionysius, Alexander of Pherae, Phalaris, and Pyrrhus.